Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 21, 2018 


President Donald Trump reverses course on some aspects of his border policy. Also on the Thursday rundown: With midterms approaching, we take you to a state that you might not expect to be reaching out to Latino voters; and reporter Dan Heyman has a novel angle on the utility of medical marijuana

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Civic Engagement

Missourians are being encouraged to press the presidential candidates to talk about their plans for social security. (aarp.org)

ST. LOUIS – Most who watched the second presidential debate at Washington University will likely agree there was more jabbing and political rhetoric than substance. Advocates are hoping the third and final debate will turn out differently. Nancy LeaMond, executive vice president and chief ad

The Green Book was published for nearly 30 years after the Great Depression so African American travelers would know where they'd be allowed to stop for food, gas, and to rest. (National Park Service)

ST. LOUIS – If you're going to take one last road trip before summer ends, there's a history lesson to learn along U.S. Route 66. Frank Norris, who works on the Route 66 Corridor Preservation program for the National Park Service, says until the Civil Rights Act in 1964, African-American tra

Missouri will be represented at the first ever national Fight for $15 convention. (Stand up KC).

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The first-ever nationwide Fight for $15 convention is being held Friday and Saturday in Richmond, Virginia. A contingent from Missouri will take part in a march and rally. Terrance Wise is a fast food worker from Kansas City, and a member of Fight for 15 and Stand Up KC. He sai

Syrian refugees fleeing war in their country are being met with resistance in some parts of the United States.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - The Syrian refugee crisis has created a lot of rhetoric in the United States, which has created fear and even hate by some toward immigrants and Muslim Americans. It has also led some state leaders to reject the resettlement of the refugees. Ira Harritt, Kansas City program coor

Animal welfare advocates say regulation of factory farms is needed to protect public health, the environment and the animals themselves. (National Institute of Health)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - It's been a busy year for animal-rights advocates in Missouri. They've been fighting nearly two dozen bills, all being considered in this last week of the legislative session. Bob Baker, executive director of the Missouri Alliance for Animal Legislation, said most are aimed at

The Missouri Legislature could approve a strong anti-abortion resolution this week, and that would mean voters ultimately decide whether to approve or deny it in November. (B. Smith)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - Missouri voters may be asked to change the state constitution to say life begins at conception. The House voted in favor of House Resolution 98 last week and now, it's the Senate's turn to debate it. The bill recognizes an unborn child as a person with a "right to life whic

Several fundraising events will support female candidates running for office in Missouri between now and the November election. (livingstoncountymo.com)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - An effort is under way in Missouri to get more women elected to office. The Missouri Women's Leadership Coalition is holding a series of fundraisers across the state to add some campaign money to the coffers of female candidates they've endorsed. Jane Crigler, president of the

Kansas and Missouri may finally end their battle for jobs by signing an agreement that's being called historic. (city-data.org)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - There's been a tug of war between Kansas and Missouri over jobs for years, but now there may be a resolution. Both states have been trying to lure businesses around the Kansas City area to cross state lines by offering tax incentives. Greg LeRoy, executive director of Good Job

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