Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 18, 2019 


Baltimore mourns Rep. Elijah Cummings, who 'Fought for All.' Also on our rundown: Rick Perry headed for door as Energy Secretary; and EPA holds its only hearing on rolling back methane regulations.

2020Talks - October 18, 2019 


While controversy swirls at the White House, Chicago teachers go on strike and Democratic primary contender retired Admiral Joe Sestak walks 105 miles across New Hampshire.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - MO: Criminal Justice

Processing rape kits can help bring justice for survivors and prevent future assaults, but thousands remain untested nationwide. (Adobe Stock)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State leaders will soon have a better grasp of the magnitude of Missouri's backlog of untested sexual assault kits. With funding from a $2.8 million federal grant, the Missouri attorney general's SAFE Kit Initiative is expected to complete its inventory of untested rape

Attorneys for convicted murderer Rusty Bucklew are asking for clemency, claiming his tumors would burst during execution and amount to torture. (ACLU)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Convicted murderer Rusty Bucklew's execution is scheduled for Oct. 1, but next week the American Civil Liberties Union will present a petition with 30,000 signatures to Gov. Mike Parson, asking that Bucklew's sentence be commuted to life in prison. The ACLU also is meet

A new report estimates that Americans owe $50 billion in post-conviction fines and fees, which can affect their right to vote. (Dodgerton Skillhause/Morguefile)

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — A new report shows 30 states, including Missouri, deny people the right to vote based on their inability to pay fees and fines associated with parole and probation. The report, by Georgetown University and the nonprofit Campaign Legal Center, is called "Can't Pay, Can't

A federal lawsuit seeks to change the way Missouri informs people on parole of their rights. (Public Domain Pictures/Pixabay)

ST. LOUIS - A class-action lawsuit seeking major reforms of Missouri's parole system just got the go-ahead from a federal judge in St. Louis. The case, Gasca vs. Precythe, alleges that the Missouri Board of Probation and Parole violates people's due-process rights by not sufficiently educating them

The First Step Act would increase

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - People languishing in federal prison for decades on nonviolent drug convictions may get a new chance at justice if the U.S. Senate finds the political will to pass sentencing reform in the final weeks of the lame-duck session. Groups on both left and right on the political spe

Each month more than 5,000 Missourians take academic classes in Department of Corrections facilities. (doc.mo.gov)

UPDATE: On Wednesday, 11/14, President Donald Trump indicated support for a prison reform bill observers believe has a chance for bipartisan Congressional passage which includes improving rehabilitation programs. JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – When Missouri hosted its first conference to address how t

The minimum wage would rise to $12 by 2023 if Proposition B passes. (Cohdra/Morguefile)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – In five days, voters in Missouri will have the chance to give many workers a raise by voting on Proposition B. The ballot measure would take the minimum wage of $7.85 an hour up to $8.60 next year and then to $12 an hour by 2023. Tony Wyche, communications director for R

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced a new drug-impaired driving enforcement campaig called

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — While law enforcement dealt with the influx of cannabis use throughout the weekend because of the close association of April 20 with marijuana, a new multi-state initiative is targeting driving under the influence. The National Highway Traffic Safety Association and law en

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