Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 18, 2019 


Acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney says President Trump is not a White supremacist. Also on the rundown: Records show that Connecticut has been helping ICE agents. Plus, some farmers are convinced year-round ethanol would be a boost.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Environment

Marines were ordered not to evacuate Camp Lejeune and to shelter in place during Hurricane Florence last September. (Marine Corps)

JACKSONVILLE, N.C. — Hurricane Florence left approximately $3.6 billion of damage at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. And a group of former military leaders and advisers say the partisan battle over climate change could harm our troops and national security in the future. Retired Rear Admiral

In signing Executive Order 80, Gov. Roy Cooper said,

RALIEGH, N.C. – With a charge to take immediate action from the governor, the North Carolina Climate Change Interagency Council wants the state's plans to fight climate change to be a household discussion. NC Interfaith Power & Light, a program of the North Carolina Council of Churches, kick

Advocates say pollinator-friendly solar farms benefit the environment and surrounding farms as they generate clean power for local communities. (The Nature Conservancy)

DURHAM, N.C. – The buzz about the demise of honeybees, birds, monarch butterflies and other crucial pollinators has prompted the creation of a North Carolina Pollinator Conservation Alliance. North Carolina is second in the country for installed solar capacity, and the alliance is offering te

Groups say blocking public access to government agencies' websites violates the core principles of public participation outlined in the National Environmental Policy Act. (criene/Twenty20)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Conservation groups are keeping a watchful eye on federal agency websites during the government shutdown and say some pages have been taken down, at agencies that include the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service Planning and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The c

North Carolina has more than 4,000 miles of streams. (habenettTwenty/20)

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – It's been a tough year for North Carolina's water resources. Like people, buildings and wildlife, bodies of water also have had to withstand the damaging effects of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and a flurry of tornadoes. Professor Tammy Kowalczyk at Appalachian Stat

The red patches on either side of the head of male red-cockaded woodpeckers are rarely seen - the birds usually conceal them unless they're excited or agitated. (Chuck Hess/U.S. Forest Service)

WILMINGTON, N.C. — The Fourth National Climate Assessment released by the federal government outlined the impacts of severe weather on the nation. North Carolina isn't immune to the risks that climate change is creating - but there are plans to help some species make a comeback. During Hurri

The Great Smoky Mountains are part of an International Biosphere Reserve helping to absorb carbon emissions. (Ken Lund/Flicker)

ASHEVILLE, N.C. – Climate change is top of mind after extreme weather events such as Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and North Carolina's land trusts have a significant role to play. The latest climate science – from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) – undersc

A bend of the New River provides an opportunity for beach access for people in Western North Carolina. (New River Conservancy)

LAUREL SPRINGS, N.C. – New River State Park in Ashe County has been the source of adventure for paddling and outdoor enthusiasts for decades, and now a planned expansion will bring a beach to the mountain community. The New River Conservancy and the state of North Carolina are in the final s

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