Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 1, 2020 


Nine cruise ships stranded as ports won't take them. Trump warns of tough two-week stretch. And rent is due, even in midst of COVID-19.

2020Talks - April 1, 2020 


Instead of delaying in-person primaries and caucuses, Alaska, Hawai'i and Wyoming have cancelled them and switched to vote-by-mail. It's Trans Day of Visibility, and the two remaining Democrats showed their support on Twitter. And the Trump administration has rolled back protections for the transgender community.

Public News Service - NC: Climate Change/Air Quality

Air pollution may put people at higher risk for developing severe COVID-19 illness, scientific studies have found. (Adobe Stock) <br />

RALEIGH, N.C. -- Health experts worldwide are warning that breathing polluted air can worsen and even cause high blood pressure, diabetes and respiratory diseases -- and early evidence suggests these conditions put people at higher risk for severe COVID-19 illness. In a recent study, Chinese resear

The exhibit

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - As the sun sets in downtown Charlotte tomorrow, an art exhibit projected onto University of North Carolina-Charlotte's Center City building will show residents orange and yellow dots sparkling over a falling blue light. The more particle pollution present, the more viewers will s

Oyster growers say the delicate environment that shellfish need to thrive is being disrupted by climate change. (Adobe Stock)

WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Oyster farmers are grappling with rising seas, ocean acidification, and more severe storms. They met in Wilmington over the weekend to discuss how to address these growing challenges. One of the goals at the Oyster South Symposium was to brainstorm ways to deal with the impacts

In 2018, 108 million Americans lived in neighborhoods that experienced more than 100 days of degraded air quality, according to a new report. (Adobe Stock)<br />

RALEIGH, N.C. -- City-dwellers in North Carolina spent several months breathing elevated levels of air pollution in 2018, according to a new report from the Environment America Research and Policy Center. Environmental Protection Agency data were analyzed from statewide air-quality monitors for two

Climate change is projected to adversely impact nationwide yields of corn, soybeans, rice, sorghum, cotton, oats, and other crops. (Adobe Stock)

COVE CITY, N.C. -- North Carolina farmers are working to keep their crops healthy amid rising temperatures and more frequent extreme weather. Last year, some growers reported extreme heat and little rain caused them to lose nearly half of their corn crop. Billy McLawhorn is an independent agricult

Wetlands are critical to North Carolina's coastal ecosystems. (Adobe Stock)

RALEIGH, N.C. -- North Carolina's mountains and coasts are teeming with biodiversity that conservationists say is under threat from global warming. As ecosystems adapt to a changing climate, it's becoming harder to predict which species will survive and which won't. Mark Anderson, director of co

Residents of Manteo, N.C., are bracing for a future of increased flooding. (Adobe Stock)

MANTEO, N.C. -- Coastal towns braced for the first high tide of the year this past weekend, and many small-business owners say they have adapted to what is becoming the "new norm" of increased flooding during high tides and more frequent extreme weather due to climate change. Jamie Anderson owns a

Coastal US military bases are increasingly vulnerable to flooding from climate change-induced extreme weather. (Adobe Stock)

RALEIGH, N.C. -- The U.S. Senate soon is expected to consider the National Defense Authorization Act, which passed in the House last week. For the first time, the bill provides funding that would help the military reduce security risks from climate change, including at vulnerable coastal military b

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