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PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2019 


Signs that the Mueller Trump/Russia probe could wrap up in the next week. Also on our Thursday rundown: A death penalty repeal likely to pass in New England. Plus, cancer survivors rally for tougher smoking laws in Tennessee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Urban Planning/Transportation

Public transportation and better schools are just two priorities that the group NC Child says would make a big difference in moving generations of children from poverty to opportunity. (NC Child)

RALEIGH, N.C. — Nearly 1 million children in North Carolina live in poor or low-income homes, according to U.S. census figures. The nonprofit group NC Child has released a series of reports on the longer-term effects of poverty on children. NC Child's Research Director Whitney Tucker said fa

About 1.2 million households in North Carolina were affected by Hurricane Florence, according to the North Carolina Dept. of Public Safety. (nesdis.noaa.gov)

WILMINGTON, N.C. – More than four months after Hurricane Florence, people in Eastern North Carolina are still awaiting FEMA recovery assistance. They can find local help at the Just Florence Recovery Survivors Summit tomorrow in Wilmington. The event is hosted by a coalition involved in on-t

Systems such as the Lynx Blue Line light rail in Charlotte are transportation options for North Carolina as the population increases. (James Willamor/flickr)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – If you feel like there are more people living in your town, you're likely not imagining it. Two-thirds of the state saw growth between 2016 and 2017, according to the latest estimates released by the U.S. Census Bureau. Estimates show that as of last July, 10.3 million peop

The NC BREATHE Conference aims to reduce the number of Code Orange days, like this one last summer in Charlotte, where air quality is dangerous for sensitive groups. (Clean Air Carolina)

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – North Carolina has come a long way in improving air quality in recent decades, but is it far enough? Recent research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds even short-term exposure to air pollution below current standards can lead to prematur

Charging stations like this one in Durham make it easier for drivers to keep on rolling in their electric vehicles. (NCDOTcommunications/Flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. — Sales of electric vehicles are on the rise - up 38 percent in 2016 and another 32 percent last year. A new report by the Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center and the Frontier Group offered strategies for cities to meet the new demands for charging stations fo

Leaders from cities such as Durham and Raleigh are asking Washington for more support in developing public transit options. (James Willamor/flickr)

DURHAM, N.C. — North Carolina mayors are joining others across the country to let Washington know about roadblocks in their pursuit of growth due to a lack of funding for infrastructure and transportation projects. Mayors from Asheville, Rocky Mount, Durham, Raleigh and other North Carolina

The Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy maintains Laurel Ridge Preserve, which adjoins Asheville Watershed land. (SAHC)

BLACK MOUNTAIN, N.C. – In many parts of North Carolina, riverfronts are becoming prime real estate, with cities such as Asheville now developing their waterways for public and private use. While development is largely good for the economy, many of the state's land conservancies are working to

With 17 Interstate highways in North Carolina, Clean Air Carolina is the plaintiff in a lawsuit filed Monday, suiting the Federal Highway Administration for its suspension of the clean-air standard. (Mark Clifton/flickr)

RALEIGH, N.C. – The Federal Highway Administration now faces a lawsuit for its abrupt suspension of the clean-air standard earlier this year. Clean Air Carolina - along with the Natural Resources Defense Council and U-S PIRG are represented in the case filed Monday by the Southern Environmen

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