Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 18, 2019 


Acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney says President Trump is not a White supremacist. Also on the rundown: Records show that Connecticut has been helping ICE agents. Plus, some farmers are convinced year-round ethanol would be a boost.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NC: Water

North Carolina has more than 4,000 miles of streams. (habenettTwenty/20)

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – It's been a tough year for North Carolina's water resources. Like people, buildings and wildlife, bodies of water also have had to withstand the damaging effects of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and a flurry of tornadoes. Professor Tammy Kowalczyk at Appalachian Stat

Wilson Creek in Caldwell County has a growing number of outdoor enthusiasts seeking out the area because of improved trout population and waterways. (Trout Unlimited)

LINVILLE FALLS, N.C. – Outdoor recreation generates $28 billion dollars annually in North Carolina, according to the Outdoor Recreation Association, and the state's thousands of miles of waterways are a large part of that. One example is the Wilson Creek watershed in Caldwell and Avery count

The Trans Alaskan Pipeline is one of the world's largest pipeline systems. The proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline would run between West Virginia and North Carolina. (Twenty20)

PEMBROKE, N.C. – Evidence of climate change is all too real for eastern North Carolina residents confronting the monumental damage from Hurricane Florence. And in the wake of the storm, efforts continue across the state to advance solar power, adapt to sea level rise and for some, to fight t

The Dan River spill was the third-largest coal ash disaster in U.S. history. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

RALEIGH, N.C. – Environmental groups in North Carolina are figuring out their next move after the Trump Administration this week rolled back some Obama-era regulations regarding coal ash disposal. Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said the new rule will provide utilities and states mor

Oyster aquaculture is a growing industry, and would include creating structures along the North Carolina coast, much like these in Florida. (Florida Sea Grant)

OUTER BANKS, N.C. — The crab pots, natural habitats and scenic vistas along North Carolina's coastline could soon be obstructed by rebar, netting and buoys if state lawmakers push ahead with House Bill 361. Coastal advocates are concerned that the bill - designed to create and promote a leas

Rock piles, also known as cairns, are becoming popular things to build for hikers, but stacking rocks can damage the habitat for native animals and plants. (bulbocode909/flickr)

FRANKLIN, N.C. – There's no shortage of creeks and streams in North Carolina to enjoy this weekend, but while exploring, experts advise outdoor enthusiasts to take care before moving rocks and changing habitat. The rocks and area surrounding them provide natural homes for insects, frogs and

The North Carolina Army National Guard delivered food and supplies to communities in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, and many of those communities are still trying to recover. (NC National Guard/flickr)

WILMINGTON, N.C. – While Tropical Depression Alberto prompted the extreme flooding experienced by North Carolina this week, hurricane season is officially beginning Friday. Eight major flood-related disasters costing more than $410 million in public assistance have impacted the state since 2

While it is unregulated by the EPA, there are concerns about human exposure to the chemical GenX and the fact it does not break down in the environment. (Vinoth Chandar/Flickr)

WILMINGTON, N.C. – This week, North Carolina lawmakers consider identical bills in House and Senate that would change the way the Department of Environmental Quality takes action on pollutants. Instead of its current model of enforcement, the governor would have to issue an administrative or

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