Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 22, 2019 


Trump lashes out at critics who claim he abuses his office; a strike at JFK airport; gun control bills in Wisconsin; a possible link between air pollution and violent crime; and very close foreign elections.

2020Talks - October 22, 2019 


After a settlement instead of what would have been the first trial in the landmark court case on the opioid crisis, we look at what 2020 candidates want to do about drug pricing.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - ND: Livable Wages/Working Families

Miners in Beulah, N.D., have seen layoffs as the coal industry declines across the country. (Andrew Filer/Flickr)

BEULAH, N.D. – Towns in coal country are considering what happens next as companies and the fuel hit hard times. Next week, the North Dakota mining town of Beulah hosts the Building Resilience in Coal Country Community Forum, featuring speakers with knowledge on economic diversification, rev

About 9% of North Dakota households experienced food insecurity between 2015 and 2017. (kuarmungadd/Adobe Stock)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Anti-hunger groups in North Dakota fear that a proposed change to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program will lead to more people going without food. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue says he wants to close a loophole in eligibility for SNAP benefits. Under the

North Dakota ranks last in the nation for early education participation rates for three- and four-year-olds. (Oksana Kuzmina/Adobe Stock)

BISMARCK, N.D. – It's almost time for North Dakota kids to go back to school – but some of the state's youngest won't be getting an education just yet. The approach of the first day of the school year spotlights how few young North Dakotans are enrolled in early education programs R

One attorney compares filling out self-representation forms to learning a new language. (tanasin/Adobe Stock)

BISMARCK, N.D. – One section of the North Dakota court system website that gets a lot of visitors is the Legal Self Help Center, but North Dakotans who choose to represent themselves in civil matters may need more resources than the state and nonprofit organizations can offer. Attorney Catie

Many North Dakota dads are feeling economically secure, which is a good sign for families in the Peace Garden State. (StockSnap/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakota dads have a reason to celebrate the state they live in this Father's Day. A new survey from WalletHub finds the Peace Garden State is 12th best in the nation for working dads. However, it also finds the workday may not be so peaceful for all dads. Although the s

Legal Services of North Dakota is a major source of legal aid for older people, veterans and Native Americans in the state. (AJEL/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakota lawmakers are considering a bill that would help low-income folks who need legal assistance. House Bill 1516 would raise funding for Legal Services of North Dakota – the go-to organization for people who can't afford an attorney in civil cases. It would

About 20 percent of Americans live in rural areas, but only 2 percent of attorneys practice in these places. (rafabordes/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – A shortage of lawyers in North Dakota could be hindering people's access to justice. Attorney job listings have increased 300 percent in the past year, according to Job Service North Dakota. While lawyers make up a small piece of the overall labor market, their role in commun

Soybean exports to China, the crop's largest export market, are down 98 percent in 2018. (United Soybean Board/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Concerns about 2019 are growing as the United States' trade war continues to hurt farmers. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue says he's confident farmers can plan ahead for market conditions. But this year, the U.S.’ largest agricultural export, soybean, is down 98

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