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PNS Daily News - December 9, 2019 


The Pensacola shooting investigated as an act of terror; Trump faces criticism over so-called anti-Semitic comments; and some local governments adapt to meet the needs of immigrants.

2020Talks - December 9, 2019 


Candidates have a busy week in Iowa, despite a weekend shooting on Pensacola Navy Air Base. Also, candidates start butting heads, notably South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg and MA Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Public News Service - ND: Rural/Farming

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North and South Dakota is preparing for the 2020 U.S. census. (Neeta Lind/Wikimedia Commons)

BISMARCK, N.D. - With the official launch of the 2020 U.S. census less than a year away, Native American communities are ramping up efforts to ensure that everyone is represented. Early outreach could be critical for an accurate count in North Dakota, where about 40% of Native Americans live in har

Corn producers hope the Environmental Protection Agency can finalize a rule on ethanol blending in time for the summer driving season. (Sweeter Alternative/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Farmers see a fresh crop on the rise with the federal government's proposal to allow ethanol-blended gasoline to be sold year-round. The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing a rule change that would lift the summertime prohibition on use of E15, or gasoline blended w

A curriculum developed by farmers unions integrates technology such as 3-D printers with the study of agriculture. (North Dakota Farmers Union)

BISMARCK, N. D. – Farmers unions are launching an agriculture-based Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) curriculum for kindergarten through 12th-grade students. Farmers unions in North Dakota and four other Midwestern states have developed hands-on lessons that meld STEM learning

About 20 percent of Americans live in rural areas, but only 2 percent of attorneys practice in these places. (rafabordes/Pixabay)

BISMARCK, N.D. – A shortage of lawyers in North Dakota could be hindering people's access to justice. Attorney job listings have increased 300 percent in the past year, according to Job Service North Dakota. While lawyers make up a small piece of the overall labor market, their role in commun

Soybean exports to China, the crop's largest export market, are down 98 percent in 2018. (United Soybean Board/Flickr)

BISMARCK, N.D. – Concerns about 2019 are growing as the United States' trade war continues to hurt farmers. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue says he's confident farmers can plan ahead for market conditions. But this year, the U.S.’ largest agricultural export, soybean, is down 98

Suicide-related calls to North Dakota's FirstLink hotline increased by 4,000 calls between 2016 and 2017. (Eli Christman/Flickr)

FARGO, N.D. – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says North Dakota has seen a disturbing spike in its suicide rate over the past two decades. FirstLink maintains the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in North Dakota and has been on the front lines of helping people in need.

The Dakota Resource Council counts reducing flaring from oil and gas operations among its victories over the past 40 years. (Dakota Resource Council)

BISMARCK, N.D. – The Dakota Resource Council is celebrating 40 years of organizing farmers and ranchers to take on extractive industries and corporate farming. Tomorrow, DRC members gather for its 40th annual meeting in Menoken to mark their successes in combating coal, oil and gas companies

The anti-corporate farming law was passed by voter initiative in 1932, and has withstood its most recent court challenge. (Krista Lundgren/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)

BISMARCK, N.D. - Family farmers in North Dakota are celebrating after a U.S. District Court upheld the state's anti-corporate farming law. In 2016, the North Dakota Farm Bureau challenged the 1932 law that restricts corporations from owning or leasing farm or ranch land. The group argued it was unc

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