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PNS Daily Newscast - January 28, 2020 


Testimony could be in play at the Trump impeachment trial. And are less strict emission standards at odds with consumers?

2020Talks - January 28, 2020 


Voters talked about "electability." What does it really mean? Democratic candidates have varying approaches, from courting Obama to Trump voters to mobilizing as many voters as possible.

Public News Service - NE: Environment

Flooding of a section of runway at Offutt Air Force Base caused planes and munitions to be moved to higher ground. (USAF)

LINCOLN, Neb. - Nebraska farmers will not be surprised to hear that 2019 was one of the wettest on record, and Karin Gleason, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said all data indicate that extreme weather events such as last year's floods, along with period

Coal executives wrote in 1966 that C02 emissions could

LINCOLN, Neb. – As court proceedings continue against ExxonMobil on claims the company misled investors about the risks of climate change, a recently discovered journal suggests the coal industry knew about the potentially catastrophic impacts of burning coal as early as 1966. Christopher Ch

Scientists say regenerative farming practices that don't use synthetic fertilizers or chemical pesticides can help capture more carbon from the atmosphere and create healthier soil for crops. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Agriculture is the fourth largest producer of climate pollution, and farmers and ranchers from across the U.S. have launched a campaign urging Congress to pass the Green New Deal, which supports regenerative family farm and ranching practices over industrial scale agribusiness.

Scientists warn that a warming planet will lead to less productive soil, restricting what can be grown and reducing the soil's ability to absorb carbon. (Nicepik)

LINCOLN, Neb. - Inspired by 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg of Sweden and record-breaking spring floods, Nebraska students are joining a global climate strike this Friday, with events scheduled in Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha. Brittni McGuire with Nebraska Climate Strike is organizing a m

U.S. beekeepers have lost more than 40% of their colonies in the past year. (Pixabay)

LYONS, Neb. – The Environmental Protection Agency has allowed the insecticide sulfoxaflor back onto the market, and a coalition of beekeepers is taking the agency to court. Greg Loarie, an attorney with the environmental law firm Earthjustice, which filed the lawsuit, notes the EPA made the

Critics of TransCanada's Keystone XL Pipeline proposal are concerned about potential threats to the Ogallala aquifer and endangered species. (Pax Ahimsa Gethen/Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Some Nebraska landowners and tribal nations are committed to fight TransCanada's proposed Keystone XL Pipeline, after the Nebraska Supreme Court's recent decision in favor of the Mainline Alternative route through Nebraska. Art Tanderup, who owns land along the proposed route

Some midwestern farmers say this was the first May in which they couldn't plant any crops, because of an extremely wet and cold spring. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. — The U.S. is coming off the wettest year on record, seen most dramatically in this spring's massive flooding. And Nebraska farmers are looking to age-old conservation practices to help them adapt. State Sen. Tim Gragert of Creighton has more than 30 years of experience with th

Since 1965, the Land and Water Conservation Fund has tapped revenues from offshore oil and gas development to preserve public lands, including Scotts Bluff National Monument. (Paul Hermans)

LINCOLN, Neb. – In a rare display of bipartisanship, last week the U.S. Senate passed a public-lands measure by a vote of 92 to 8 that includes indefinitely extending the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Now, all eyes are on members of the House, who could vote on the public-lands package as

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