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PNS Daily Newscast - August 13, 2020 


Minutes after Biden selected Harris as VP, she throws first punch at Trump; teachers raise their hands with safety concerns.


2020Talks - August 13, 2020 


Joe Biden and Kamala Harris make their first public appearance as running mates. President Trump calls Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene a GOP "star," despite her support for conspiracy theory QAnon.

Public News Service - NE: Climate Change/Air Quality

Nebraska currently produces more than 2,132 megawatts of wind power, and an additional 1,000 megawatts from wind is under construction. (Chris Lim/Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Support for renewable energy in the U.S. cuts across party lines, according to a new Yale University report. Three in four Republicans surveyed are in favor of increased funding for clean energy research, generating power on public lands and giving tax rebates for installing solar

Approximately 57,000 orphan wells are documented on federal, state, tribal and private lands, and hundreds of thousands more are undocumented or at risk of being abandoned and not plugged. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- As the oil and gas industry braces for more pain because of falling demand and a glutted market, 31 oil and gas producing states, including Nebraska, are asking the Trump administration to put unemployed oil and gas workers back to work cleaning up abandoned well sites. With Congr

Installed solar capacity in the United States is projected to more than double in the next five years. (Pixabay)

LYONS, Neb. -- The growth of the solar industry has brought a wave of new projects to Nebraska, including a community solar farm in Scottsbluff that's expected to save the city more than $2 million in energy costs over 25 years. With more projects on the horizon, Lu Nelsen, policy program associat

Flooding of a section of runway at Offutt Air Force Base caused planes and munitions to be moved to higher ground. (USAF)

LINCOLN, Neb. - Nebraska farmers will not be surprised to hear that 2019 was one of the wettest on record, and Karin Gleason, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said all data indicate that extreme weather events such as last year's floods, along with period

Coal executives wrote in 1966 that C02 emissions could

LINCOLN, Neb. – As court proceedings continue against ExxonMobil on claims the company misled investors about the risks of climate change, a recently discovered journal suggests the coal industry knew about the potentially catastrophic impacts of burning coal as early as 1966. Christopher Ch

Scientists say regenerative farming practices that don't use synthetic fertilizers or chemical pesticides can help capture more carbon from the atmosphere and create healthier soil for crops. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Agriculture is the fourth largest producer of climate pollution, and farmers and ranchers from across the U.S. have launched a campaign urging Congress to pass the Green New Deal, which supports regenerative family farm and ranching practices over industrial scale agribusiness.

Scientists warn that a warming planet will lead to less productive soil, restricting what can be grown and reducing the soil's ability to absorb carbon. (Nicepik)

LINCOLN, Neb. - Inspired by 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg of Sweden and record-breaking spring floods, Nebraska students are joining a global climate strike this Friday, with events scheduled in Kearney, Lincoln and Omaha. Brittni McGuire with Nebraska Climate Strike is organizing a m

Some midwestern farmers say this was the first May in which they couldn't plant any crops, because of an extremely wet and cold spring. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. — The U.S. is coming off the wettest year on record, seen most dramatically in this spring's massive flooding. And Nebraska farmers are looking to age-old conservation practices to help them adapt. State Sen. Tim Gragert of Creighton has more than 30 years of experience with th

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