Newscasts

PNS Daily News - September 18, 2019 


President Trump visits California, targeting its homelessness crisis and environmental protections; and Tennessee is a top destination for out-of-state women seeking abortions.

2020Talks - September 19, 2019. (3 min.)  


Former Illinois Rep. Joe Walsh on why he's challenging President Trump; and how Iowa keeps its status as the first caucus of primary season.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NE: Rural/Farming

During the 2017-2018 school year, Nebraska Farm to School reported $2.7 million in total local food purchases. Products included melons, various vegetables, chicken and milk. (USDA)

LYONS, Neb. - Nebraskans spend $4.4 billion on food annually, but only 10 percent of that money is spent on food grown in the state, according to a new report from the Center for Rural Affairs and the Nebraska Food Council. Researchers tapped state and national data to create a comprehensive pictur

Personal property used in agriculture production valued up to $100,000 may be exempted from Nebraska personal property taxes under the state's Beginning Veteran Farmer Tax Credit program. (Ken Hawkins/Flickr)

LYONS, Neb. — With the 2019 legislative session just around the corner, champions of Nebraska's Beginning Farmer Tax Credit are hoping to leverage the program's success to open more land to military veterans. Created in 2001, the program offers both landowners and new farmers tax incentives

Of the more than 25 million households that lack access to broadband Internet, 19 million of them are in rural areas. (Pixabay)

LYONS, Neb. – In Nebraska, just 5 percent of residents in 18 of the state's 93 counties have access to broadband Internet, according to a new report from the Center for Rural Affairs. Report author Johnathan Hladik, the center’s policy director, says lack of reliable information is par

The first

NAPER, Neb. — Solar panels are being installed on land along the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline in Nebraska and South Dakota to power the homes, farms and indigenous spirit camps of communities opposed to the project. Ranchers Bob and Nancy Allpress became the third Nebraska fami

Proponents of restorative justice classes say by hearing directly from victims, people who commit crimes can better understand the scale of the harm they have caused. (Bimblebury/Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. – An outside-the-box approach to criminal justice in Nebraska is helping decrease the chance of formerly incarcerated people returning to prison, and saving taxpayer dollars. The Community Justice Center's restorative justice classes help offenders break down and identify the e

Local food advocates hope to lengthen Nebraska's growing season by installing more high tunnels. (USDA)

LYONS, Neb. – Leaders from across Nebraska are ready to launch a comprehensive statewide food assessment, one goal of the Nebraska Food Council's new board of directors in gearing up for the big fall harvest. Sandra Renner, project associate for the Center for Rural Affairs, said the assessme

More than 1,000 farmers have participated in a program designed to connect struggling families with healthy foods. The Double Up Food Bucks program, launched in Detroit in 2009, is now in its second year in Nebraska. (Allen Sheffield/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Nebraskans struggling to make ends meet are getting a boost from local farmers, and it's a two-way street. Farmers also are benefitting from the Double Up Food Bucks program. Morgan Hartline, the assistant extension educator with SNAP-Ed at the University of Nebraska, explain

Immigrant business owners generated more than $65 million in business income in Nebraska in 2015.(Rhea Landholm)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Small businesses are a key element of Nebraska's economy, supporting the jobs of nearly half of the workers in the state. Many resources are available to help wannabe small-business owners make their vision a reality. Among them is the Center for Rural Affairs' Rural Enterpri

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