Newscasts

PBS Daily Newscast - July 8, 2020 


Mary Trump's book labels our president a reckless leader who paid a pal to take his SAT test; Nevada lawmakers meet to address pandemic shortfall.

2020Talks - July 8, 2020 


The Movement for Black Lives announces a new proposal to overhaul policing and invest in Black communities; NJ and DE have primary elections today; and some political candidates join in a Facebook advertising boycott.

Public News Service - NE: Social Justice

A new online anti-racist toolkit includes tips for advocating while practicing safe social distancing, and from the comfort of your couch. (Becker1999/Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- With demonstrations sparked by the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer well into their second week, civic organizations in Nebraska are offering resources for individuals who want to end state-sanctioned violence against people of color. Ashlei Spivey, an Ameri

A current initiative gathering signatures for the November ballot would ban lobbyists, elected officials, party leaders, current and former political candidates or their family members from serving on independent citizens commission charged with redrawing voting district maps. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- The COVID-19 health emergency has created new challenges for proponents of a ballot initiative that aims to put an independent citizens commission in charge of drawing voting district maps. With people avoiding contact at grocery stores, and big gatherings postponed indefinitely,

Unemployed Nebraskans have 60 days to enroll for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act online at HealthCare.gov, because loss of employment is a qualifying event that opens up a special enrollment period. (Bytemarks/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Since the economic fallout of the COVID-19 health emergency began in March, the number of workers applying for unemployment benefits has skyrocketed, and so has the number of people who lost their employer-based health insurance. In Nebraska, 120,000 workers have lost jobs, accord

The U.S. District Court of Nebraska holds a status hearing today on an emergency motion requesting the release of the state's plan for prevention, management and treatment of COVID-19 in Nebraska prisons. (USAF)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Nebraska's overcrowded prisons could put their incarcerated residents at greater risk of an outbreak of COVID-19, and a coalition of legal groups want the state to share its plans for keeping those serving time, prison employees and their families safe. Adam Sipple, legal director

Nebraska's prison population is currently at nearly 160% of capacity, making the state the second most overcrowded in the nation. (California Department of Corrections/Wikimedia Commons)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- The Nebraska Department of Correctional Services has announced that it will consider plans to build a 1,600 bed private prison to help ease currently overcrowded conditions and address projected growth in prison populations. Sam Petto, communications director for the American Civi

The number of states that prohibit discrimination against LGBTQ students in schools nearly doubled between 2010 and 2020, from nine to 15. (William Murphy/Flickr)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- This year the U.S. Supreme Court is expected to decide three cases that could determine whether or not federal discrimination protections apply to LGBTQ workers, and a new report maps how widely protections vary across the nation. The report's author, Logan Casey, policy researche

By 2024, 41 million people ages 55 and older are projected to be in the labor force, nearly an 8% increase from the current number. (Pxfuel)

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Legislation to protect older workers in Nebraska and around the nation from discrimination in the workplace heads to the U.S. Senate after the House passed the Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act last week. Todd Stubbendieck, state director of AARP Nebraska, says e

Single mothers with a bachelor's degree earn $1,082,059 in total lifetime earnings, $562,545 more than their peers with only a high school education. (Pixabay)<br /><br />

LINCOLN, Neb. -- Nebraska would see a big return on investments that help single mothers graduate from college, according to a new report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research. Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, the institute's study director, says the economic well-being of Nebraska's more than 10,

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