Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2018 


A GOP Congressman and former FBI agent tells NPR he believes Trump was compromised by Putin. Also on the Monday rundown: a report on how trade wars could be risky business for the whiskey business: and the wealthiest Americans get richer as the wage gap widens.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NE: Criminal Justice

Canvassers are going door to door offering brochures with basic civic information on how to participate in the upcoming midterm elections, set for Nov. 6. (Courtesy Graphic)

SOUTH SIOUX CITY, Neb. – With Nebraska's primaries in the rearview mirror, volunteers with the group, Unity in Action, are setting their sights on mobilizing voters for the upcoming November midterm elections. Ismael Valadez, the president of the group, says canvassers are working primarily

Individuals in the U.S. pay about five times more in taxes than corporations. (National Priorities Project)

LINCOLN, Neb. – Whether you owe the IRS or it owes you, Tax Day is an annual reminder of how much money Americans give the federal government each year. A new report shows exactly where that money is being spent. The National Priorities Project crunched the numbers on 2017 federal spending,

An estimated two out of three people in U.S. jails have not been convicted of the charges against them. (Pixabay)

LINCOLN, Neb. — Nebraska received an "F" for its pretrial justice system in a new report, but there are attempts to improve the process already in the works. The pretrial phase is the period from the accused person's first contact with law enforcement to the resolution of charges through ple

Nebraska prisons hit

LINCOLN, Neb. – A coalition is seeking class-action status for a lawsuit to end overcrowding in Nebraska prisons. At nearly 160 percent of capacity, civil-liberties advocates say the overcrowding has led to constitutional violations that endanger the health, safety and lives of those who are i

Thirty of 49 Nebraska senators are needed to overturn a veto of a voting-rights bill for felons who have completed their sentences. (Nebraska Secretary of State)

LINCOLN, Neb. – About 7,000 people live, work and pay taxes in Nebraska, but aren't eligible to vote in elections. That's because under current law, people with felony convictions must wait two years after completing their sentences before their voting rights are restored. State lawmakers rec

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