Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 21, 2019 


Could the nation’s airports be the next pressure points in the government shutdown? Also on our Monday rundown: Calls go out to improve food safety; and a new report renews calls for solutions to Detroit’s water woes.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NM: Endangered Species & Wildlife

The Bureau of Land Management is poised to sell off 84,000 acres of public and ancestral lands for oil and gas drilling, after the shortest public-engagement period ever noted in the West. (sanjuancitizens.org)

SANTA FE — New Mexico is becoming an "energy sacrifice zone," according to those who oppose the sale of 84,000 acres of state lands for oil and gas drilling. Opponents will rally at the Bureau of Land Management's headquarters in Santa Fe on Wednesday, one day ahead of Thursday's planned onl

Hikers with dogs should be aware that animal traps on public lands can be as close as 25 yards from trails or roads. (peta.org)

SANTA FE, N. M. – There's still a month left in the animal-trapping season and, with the weather warming, hikers on public lands need to exercise caution – especially if they bring their dogs along. Trapping for fox, badger, weasel, ringtail and bobcat is legal on public lands from Nov.

The large populations of gray wolves that once roamed the Southwest were killed off because of the threat they posed to cattle ranchers. (earthjustice.org)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- Several advocate groups have filed an intent to sue the U.S. government over the Mexican gray wolf recovery plan released last week. They now have 60 days to submit the paperwork. The goal set forth in the government's recovery plan is to have an average of 320 Mexican gray wo

Conservation groups say New Mexico and Arizona are at a tipping point for the recovery of Mexican gray wolves in the wild. (Defenders of Wildlife)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - New Mexico residents can tell the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service what they think about a revised Mexican wolf recovery plan in Truth or Consequences on Thursday and Albuquerque on Saturday. The plan aims to increase the wolf population that roams northern New Mexico and Arizona

Conservationists say the budget proposal from President Donald Trump's Interior Secretary hurts the outdoor industry in New Mexico at the worst possible time. (Wikimedia/Creative Commons)

SANTA FE, N.M. – Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke has recommended budget cuts that create unsavory conditions to public lands and parks in New Mexico, according to conservationists. It begins with an 80 percent reduction to the Land and Water Conservation Fund then goes on to cut $30 mil

New Mexico conservationists are worried about taking public lands out of public hands. (Creative Commons/Flikr)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – About 30 percent of New Mexico state trust lands have been sold over the years, and a new report shows why that long-term trend is a concern for sportsmen and conservation groups. The Wilderness Society report says privatization means when people go hunting, fishing, hiking

Senate Bill 268, which makes it illegal to kill coyotes as part of a contest with prizes, passed in the Senate yesterday. (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

SANTA FE, N.M. - Wildlife advocates are cheering passage of a bill in the New Mexico Senate yesterday that would prohibit hunting coyotes as a contest. Senate Bill 268 arose from outcries against groups that began organizing coyote hunts for cash and prizes several years ago, but the legislation ha

Two bills introduced Monday would designate parts of Organ Mountain-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande Del Norte National Monuments as Wilderness Areas. (Lisa Mandelkern)

SANTA FE, N.M. -- New Mexico Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich have just reintroduced two bills to designate sections of two national monuments as wilderness areas to protect them from future development. The bills would extend wilderness protections to parts of the Organ Mountains-Desert Pea

1 of 11 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »