Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - December 11, 2018 


The U.S. support of fossil fuels is met with protests and laughter at the UN climate conference. Also, on the Tuesday rundown: we take you to a major city with a look at how segregation impacts life outcomes. Plus, efforts to aid more veteran farmers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NM: Senior Issues

For Santa Clara's Centro de Amistad Community Center, installing solar panels means the money once spent on electric bills can be used to feed senior citizens. (New Energy Economy)

SILVER CITY, N.M. – At the heart of an economic development effort in the Village of Santa Clara in southern New Mexico, a rooftop solar system is now part of the senior center. It's known as the Centro de Amistad Community Center, and Mayor Richard Bauch says solar's longevity makes it a gr

Brush up on hand-washing hygiene. The flu season isn't even half over, but New Mexico is reporting more influenza cases and deaths than last year. (new.mit.edu)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – The flu season is weeks away from its annual peak and already cases of reported influenza in New Mexico are double what they were at this time last year. The state has reported six flu-related deaths this season and 12 outbreaks – meaning high numbers of cases in a

Worries are increasing for family health care advocates with the addition of a new amendment to the GOP health care proposal. (Flickr/Creative Commons)

SANTA FE, N.M. -- President Trump and GOP members of Congress have a new twist in their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare, and family advocates are more concerned than ever about the effect it would have on New Mexicans. The "MacArthur Amendment," named for the New Jersey Republican who negotia

Many New Mexico food stamp recipients will have to find jobs in order to keep their benefits, under new state regulations. (Wikimedia Commons)

SANTA FE, N.M. - New regulations for the new year now require many of New Mexico's food stamp recipients to find work in order to keep their benefits. Reinstating New Mexico's work rules for getting food assistance means as many as 60,000 people must find a job in the state with the nation's highest

July 30th anniversary of social safety net programs Medicare and Medicaid. Credit: medicaid.gov

SANTA FE, N.M. - A new report shows how many people in New Mexico benefit from Medicaid as the program's 50th anniversary on July 30 draws near. Judy Solomon, vice president of health policy with the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, says Medicaid provides health coverage for 576,

PHOTO: A new report says more Americans are retiring to communities in the West, like Las Cruces, that are home to protected public lands, such as the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument. Photo courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

LAS CRUCES, N.M. - Older Americans are three times more likely to retire in areas of New Mexico and other Western states that have protected public lands such as the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument near Las Cruces. That's the finding of a new report from the Center for Western Priori

PHOTO: Fewer people are dying from fall-related injuries in New Mexico, but according to a recent report the state ranks sixth in the nation for fall-related deaths. Health officials say regular exercise can prevent falls by helping build muscle and balance. Photo credit: City of Tucson, Arizona.

SANTA FE, N.M. - Falls are the leading cause of unintentional-injury deaths in New Mexico, but according to a recent report from the Department of Health, the state's fall-related death rate has fallen 10 percent in recent years. Robin Swift, section manager at the Office of Injury Prevention at th

PHOTO: Private sector and government agencies are gathering in Albuquerque on Thursday to share ideas and resources on how to reduce hunger in the state. Photo courtesy of the Roadrunner Food Bank.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - A conference addressing hunger in New Mexico is underway in Albuquerque, and according to one organization, as many as one in four children in the state don't have enough food to eat on a regular basis. Kathy Komoll, executive director with the New Mexico Association of Food Ban

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