Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 14, 2019 


Hundreds of companies urge Trump to resolve tariff dispute with China. Also on our Friday rundown: California moves closer to universal health coverage. Plus, new Gulf restoration projects – a decade after the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NV: Poverty

Experts say low-income rentals are becoming harder to find in Nevada, and that landlord-tenant disputes are rampant. (Public Domain/Wikimedia)

CARSON CITY, Nev. - Legal-aid groups are voicing support for a bill to prevent trouble between Nevada landlords and tenants. Senate Bill 256 already has passed the Senate and now awaits a hearing in the state Assembly's Commerce Committee. The bill would make a number of changes, including defining

The CFPB is preparing to rescind a set of rules on payday lenders that were finalized in 2017 but never went into effect. (Griffith Center For Economic Integrity)

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Nevada Attorney General Aaron Ford is calling on the Trump administration to allow Obama-era rules on payday lending to take effect. Ford and 25 other state attorneys general sent a letter asking the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to stop delaying a rule that

A new report shows that instability in the individual health insurance market is a big reason why Nevada children are losing coverage. (Shawn 1/Pixabay)

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Almost a decade's worth of progress on getting Nevada's children insured has come to a halt – and has even begun to slip – largely due to changes in federal policy since President Donald Trump took office, according to a new report. Researchers at the Georgetow

Nine Nevada organizations are joining together to host a forum next week about payday lending. (Taber Andrew Bain/Flickr)

LAS VEGAS — A free workshop in Las Vegas on Monday is aimed at educating people about the risks of payday loans. Short-term, high-interest, payday lending is prohibited in several states - and many states that do allow these loans put limits on the amount of interest that can build up on the

Nevada has only 84 attorneys that provide free legal assistance to the state's low-income population of nearly 500,000. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)

CARSON CITY, Nev. – If you can't afford an attorney, one will be provided for you in American criminal courts. But that isn't the case in civil courts, and a new study examines the thousands of cases each year of Nevadans facing the legal system without representation. Commissioned by the Nev

Enrolling CHILDREN in educational summer activities would cost many Nevada family more than half of their summer income, according to the Center for American Progress. (BLM/Flickr)

CARSON CITY, Nev. – When children are out of school during the summer, many Nevada families struggle to pay for child care, according to recent analysis from the Center for American Progress. The analysis compares costs of summer child care to median incomes in each state. Cristina Novoa, a

The Food Bank of Northern Nevada received more than 100,000 pounds of donated food through the recent nationwide Stamp Out Hunger food drive, but all of that must be sorted by volunteers before it expires. (F Delventhal/Flickr)

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Food banks typically see a big spike in volunteers around Thanksgiving and Christmas. But during the summer, those same charitable organizations often find themselves short-staffed. Some food banks in Nevada are now desperate for volunteers. When school is out for the sum

Short-term loans can become long-term cycles of debt when borrowers can't afford high-interest payments, consumer advocates say. (Taber Andrew Bain/Flickr)

LAS VEGAS — Nearly one-third of title-loan, check cashing and payday lending services in Nevada were rated "less than satisfactory" in a recent state audit of financial institutions. Consumer rights attorneys say more should be done to regulate short-term, high-interest lenders in the state.

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