Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 4, 2020 


Four former Minneapolis police officers involved in the killing of George Floyd now face criminal charges; faith leaders call for action against racial injustice.

2020Talks - June 4, 2020 


The 2020 Census, delayed because of the new coronavirus, is ramping back up to provide an accurate count so, among other things, states can redraw districts for 2021 and 2022. Plus, national figures across the country decry President Trump's response to protests.

Public News Service - NY: Senior

Socially distanced and virtual vigils are taking place at nursing homes across New York state. (NY Caring Majority)

NEW YORK -- Seniors, community, faith and labor leaders joined in vigils at nursing homes over the Memorial Day weekend to demand more protections for workers and residents. So far in the pandemic, New York nursing homes have seen more than 5,800 confirmed and probable COVID-19 deaths. People in th

People with diseases or on medications that compromise their immune systems are more vulnerable to the new coronavirus known as COVID-19. (Photographee.eu/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK -- Advocates for people with disabilities say the new coronavirus can be especially dangerous to the communities they serve. People with disabilities such as lupus or HIV/AIDS have compromised immune systems. Some medications may lower resistance to infections, and the incidence of lung d

The CDPA Program allows people with disabilities to hire friends or family to provide needed home care. (mjowra/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK — A cut in state funding will severely impact a program that helps people with disabilities remain in their homes. That's the message advocates for people with disabilities want Gov. Andrew Cuomo to hear. The Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program allows people who need home

Three-quarters of New York City subway stations still are inaccessible for wheelchair users. (Tdorante10 [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)])

NEW YORK — A federal class-action lawsuit claims New York City's subway system has broken the law by failing to make stations wheelchair accessible. The lawsuit was filed by the group Disability Rights Advocates on behalf of individual plaintiffs and a coalition of disability organizations.

Good news for New York City residents in wheelchairs: The city has agreed to survey crosswalks citywide and schedule repairs of missing or damaged curb cuts. (Steve Buissinne/Pixabay)

NEW YORK – Advocates for people with disabilities are calling the settlement of two class-action lawsuits in New York City "historic." The agreement is good news for members of the city's disability community, who have struggled with missing or deteriorating curb cuts, missing detectable traf

The average SNAP benefit now equals $1.36 per meal. (photo: USDA)

NEW YORK – The Farm Bill passed by Congress last week did not include major cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), but food security advocates say the bill falls short of meeting nutritional needs. The House version of the Farm Bill had included new work requirements f

Advocates want NYS to pass legislation encouraging new housing to have accessible first floor apartments. (CDC)

NEW YORK – Time is running out for action on some state bills important for New Yorkers with disabilities. The legislative session ends on Wednesday, but some bills that would help people with disabilities have yet to come up for a vote. Susan Dooha, executive director of the Center for In

About 17 million American families pay 30 percent or more of their income in rent. (Photos public domain)

NEW YORK – High rents are threatening families' financial security and putting home ownership out of reach for many, according to a new report. The analysis from The Pew Charitable Trusts says since the Great Recession, the number of households paying more than 30 percent of their pre-tax inc

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