Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 13, 2019 


Public impeachment hearings in Washington; dreamers protest in Texas; roadless wilderness areas possibly at risk around the country; and an ozone indicating garden, at the North Carolina Governor's Mansion.

2020Talks - November 13, 2019 


Supreme Court hears DACA arguments, and likely will side with the Trump administration, but doesn't take up a gun manufacturer's appeal. Former SC Gov. Mark Sanford drops out of presidential race; and former President Jimmy Carter recovers from brain surgery.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - NY: Water

Extreme weather due to climate change can exacerbate pollution runoff and toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes. (Jacob/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK – A coalition of more than 160 local, state and national environmental groups is asking every presidential candidate how he or she will address threats to drinking water supplies for more than 30 million people. The Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Coalition has released a presidentia

The oyster populations from Maine to Florida has shrunk to less than 10% of its historic size. (nulovetoyo/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK – The efforts to restore shellfish to New York Harbor and Long Island have made real progress, but there's still a long way to go. Long before New York City was The Big Apple, it was known as The Big Oyster. New York Harbor once had more than 200,000 acres of oyster reefs and Long

For small towns, the EPA does not require testing drinking water for emerging contaminants. (Daniel Case [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)])

ALBANY, N.Y. – Many drinking-water sources in New York state are not tested for a variety of dangerous chemicals, but a new bill in the State Assembly could remedy that. Every few years, the federal Environmental Protection Agency publishes a list of emerging contaminants - chemicals determin

The EPA classified 200 miles of the Hudson River as a Superfund site in 1983. (brittanymoser/AdobeStock)<br />

NEW YORK — New York plans to sue the Environmental Protection Agency for giving General Electric a Certificate of Completion for its cleanup of PCBs in the upper Hudson River. The EPA said the $1.7 billion cleanup of PCBs, a suspected human carcinogen, satisfies the 2002 agreement with Gener

It has been more than three years since PFOA was found in drinking water in Hoosick Falls, N.Y. (Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)/flickr)

ALBANY, N.Y. — Environmental groups are calling for New York State to establish very low permissible levels of some hazardous chemicals in drinking water. The state's Drinking Water Quality Council is holding meetings this afternoon in Albany, New York City and on Long Island. The council is

A groundwater sample in Hoosick Falls found PFOA at 130,000 parts per trillion. (com77380/Pixabay)

ALBANY, N.Y. – Environmental, civic and research groups are calling on New York State to set maximum levels of unregulated industrial chemicals in drinking water. More than a dozen groups have signed on to a letter asking the Department of Health and the Drinking Water Quality Council to est

Curbing nutrient pollution has reduced the size and duration of dead zones in Western Long Island Sound. (Barbara Edwards/Pixabay)

PATCHOGUE, N.Y. — A two-year study has found that seasonal levels of dissolved oxygen in parts of Long Island's Great South Bay fall too low to support sea life. Nitrogen pollution from septic systems and cesspools is the main culprit. Carl LoBue, New York Oceans Program director with The Na

Sewage treatment plants are not required to remove pharmaceuticals from the water they treat. (Jim Henderson/Wikimedia Commons)

NEW YORK – A new study has found concentrations of prescription drugs in water throughout a 155-mile stretch of the Hudson River. Researchers tested water samples for 16 different pharmaceutical compounds including antibiotics, cholesterol medication and acetaminophen. According to Andrew Ju

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