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PNS Daily Newscast - August 7, 2020 


The State Attorney of NY moves to dissolve the NRA; an update on the potential wave of pandemic evictions.


2020Talks - August 7, 2020 


The Commission on Presidential Debates rejects Trump campaign's request for a fourth debate. Hawaii has a primary tomorrow, but there are only 8 vote service centers.

Public News Service - NY: Criminal Justice

A recent <a href=report says solitary confinement in federal and state prisons has increased 500% due to the COVID pandemic. (boscorelli/Adobe Stock)">

NEW YORK -- As New York moves to reform police practices, human rights advocates say the state needs to end the use of solitary confinement in prisons, too. Solitary confinement lasting more than 15 days is recognized by the United Nations as a form of torture. But in New York, prisoners are sub

Students rallying at City Hall in New York City call for more guidance counselors and fewer police in public schools. (Photo: Urban Youth Collaborative)

NEW YORK -- Students in New York City are calling for school safety to be taken out of the hands of the police department. They call it the school-to-prison pipeline, zero-tolerance policies that involve police in minor incidents leading to student arrests, juvenile detention and incarceration.

Advocates say police violence against peaceful protesters has amplified calls for accountability. (Peter Kim/Adobe Stock)

ALBANY, N.Y. -- New York state lawmakers are expected to act on police reform bills this week, including a repeal of a law that shields police officers' disciplinary records from public scrutiny. Civil rights law 50-a has been on the books for 44 years, but the killing of George Floyd in Minneapol

Families and advocates demand testing of all incarcerated people and clemency for those most at risk of COVID-19.  (Walter Hergt/North Star Fund)

NEW YORK -- Formerly incarcerated people and the families and communities of people now in prison held a vigil outside Fishkill Correctional Facility on Friday to demand the release of those most vulnerable to COVID-19. Congregate living quarters and little or no personal protective equipment make

A one-week delay in reducing jail populations could mean 18,000 lives lost to COVID-19, according to a new report. (Lightfield Studios/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK -- A new epidemiological model released by the American Civil Liberties Union says unless jail populations are reduced immediately, the COVID-19 pandemic could claim about 100,000 more American lives, doubling current projections. There are almost 740,000 people in American jails where so

The lack of privacy during stay-at-home orders can make accessing domestic violence services more difficult for the people who need them. (sdecoret/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK -- While stay-at-home measures appear to be slowing the spread of the new coronavirus, they are also leading to an increase in domestic violence. It's a worldwide phenomenon. Where social distancing keeps people in their homes, reports of domestic violence have surged. In New York City,

Karl Taylor (L) was one of nearly 10,000 people in New York prisons who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. (Photo courtesy Julia Ramsay-Nobles)

NEW YORK -- Attorneys have reached a landmark $5 million settlement in a lawsuit over the 2015 death of a New York state prisoner at the hands of corrections officers. Prison officials had claimed that 51-year-old Karl Taylor died of a heart attack. But lawyers for Taylor's family alleged the man,

With mobile device forensic tools, police can decrypt and download all the information on a cell phone. (Saklakova/Adobe Stock)

NEW YORK - New Yorkers have a right to know how police are searching their cell phones, according to a lawsuit filed against the NYPD. The suit was filed in State Supreme Court more than 10 months after the NYPD first received a freedom-of-information request (FOIA) for records on its use of mobil

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