Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - OR: Climate Change/Air Quality

A bill in Congress would create a $3 billion program for coastal restoration projects. (Iriana Shiyan/Adobe Stock)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Communities on the Oregon coast could see sorely needed investments from an infrastructure bill now in Congress. Jean Flemma, director of the Ocean Defense Initiative, said COVID-19 has hit the economies of coastal communities hard, with many fishing-related businesses losing thei

Food production makes up 25% of greenhouse gas emissions, but Americans throw away as much as 40% of edible food. (Pixel-Shot/Adobe Stock)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Edible food is wasted on a massive scale in the United States, but there are signs that it could be coming back to Americans' plates. The Upcycled Food Association has officially defined "upcycled food," paving the way for a certification program akin to organic labeling later thi

Gov. Kate Brown kept her promise to enact sweeping climate action if it didn't come from the Oregon Legislature this year. (Oregon Dept. of Transportation/Flickr)

SALEM, Ore. -- Stymied at the Oregon Legislature, conservation groups are celebrating an extensive list of climate actions from Gov. Kate Brown. Brown has announced an executive order that spans multiple business sectors to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. It includes expanding the Clean Fuels Prog

Eelgrass is critical habitat for juvenile crab and salmon. (David Ayers/U.S. Geological Survey)

COOS BAY, Ore. -- A natural gas terminal proposed for southern Oregon could endanger a sea plant critical to commercial fishing and ocean habitats, scientists say. Mike Graybill, a marine scientist in Coos Bay, said the forest of eelgrass in the area's tidal waters is crucial habitat for a variety

Farmers across Oregon believe climate change is hurting them financially. (Sheila Sund/Flickr)

SALEM, Ore. -- With tensions high in Salem as lawmakers begin work on a cap-and-invest bill, one organization is reminding legislators that voices in agriculture are not a monolith on this issue. The Oregon Climate and Agriculture Network, representing more than 250 farmers and ranchers across the

Environmental groups want the Oregon legislature and Gov. Kate Brown to take action to curb climate change next year. (Backbone Campaign/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Oregon's climate future could be decided in several ways in the New Year. During the legislature's short session in February, lawmakers will take another crack at a cap-and-invest bill. In the 2019 session, Republican senators walked out of the State Capitol to prevent passage

Preserving forests in the Northwest would be the equivalent of not burning fossil fuels for eight years in the Western United States, a study has found. (Oregon State University)

PORTLAND, Ore. - New Oregon State University research says Pacific Northwest forests are integral for mitigating the effects of climate change. The study, published in Ecological Applications, identifies forests along the western slope of the Cascade Mountains and some in the Northern Rockies as mo

Pumped hydro storage can be used to store energy from renewable energy sources, like wind and solar. (Wikimedia Commons)

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – As the Pacific Northwest eyes using more renewable energy, one big question arises – how will it be stored? New research from the firm Energy and Environmental Economics finds the region's current storage capacity could fall short by 10,000 megawatts by 2030. On

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