Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - Friday, August 23, 2019 


A federal court ruling changes how the President is elected, and Florida Democrats trigger a special session vote on guns. Those stories and more in today's news.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Rural/Farming

An EPA investigation into the use of pesticides near a California high school took 12 years to resolve. (Mr_Write/morguefile)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Despite more than 300 complaints that local environmental regulations have been discriminatory toward minority communities, the Environmental Protection Agency has never made a formal finding of a civil-rights violation. According to the Center for Public Integrity, none of the ei

Farmworker Housing Development Corp. builds housing, such as the building above, for farmworkers and their families. (FHDC)

PORTLAND, Ore. – As fresh cherries go on display in Oregon's grocery stores, one organization is thinking about the workers who pick the fruit – and their need for safe living conditions. The Farmworker Housing Development Corporation (FHDC) in Woodburn has been developing housing for

Beekeepers' colonies have been in decline for the past decade, and a new federal survey says last year was no exception. (pixabay)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Both bees and beekeepers are feeling the sting as a new federal survey confirms that keepers lost 28 percent of their colonies last winter, after losses of 22 percent the previous year. The survey results are in keeping with a larger trend that started a decade ago, when bee number

Bend is considering expansion of its urban growth boundary to accommodate the city's rapidly-growing population. (Another Believer/Wikimedia Commons)

PORTLAND, Ore. - City managers in Bend held a meeting Thursday that will help shape the city's expanding borders after it is approved by a state commission. Urban growth boundaries or UGB's hem in cities like Bend to prevent urban sprawl into rural areas. However, Bend has consistently ranked as

Jordan Cove, above, is the potential site of a large liquefied natural gas terminal, which would have a capacity of 6 million tons annually. (Visitor7/Wikimedia Commons)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Residents of Coos Bay, Ore., who think a years-long fight over a liquefied natural-gas terminal is over might be wrong. A Canadian energy company backing the Jordan Cove terminal signed a preliminary deal last week with a Japanese power company, agreeing to purchase 1.5 milli

Mobile clinics are becoming a popular way to serve veterans health care, according to Rep. Cedric Hayden, R-Cottage Grove. (William Heimbuch/U.S. Navy)

PORTLAND, Ore. - In small Oregon towns where there are no clinics to visit, the clinics visit the residents. Mobile clinics are gaining popularity across the state for people who have limited or no access to nearby facilities, and they are providing an array of health services. State Representat

Omega-3 acids, found in organic foods from grass-fed cattle, have been linked to lowered risks of cardiovascular disease. (Gary Halvorson/Oregon State Archives)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Researchers' analysis of a bulk of studies from around the world finds organic production of dairy and meat delivers more nutrients to diners. The recent study published in the British Journal of Nutrition shows organic meat and dairy contains 50 percent more omega-3 fatty acids,

Even some Portland city-dwellers took the time to make their views known about the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Burns. (Rural Organizing Project)

ROSEBURG, Ore. - About 350 people gathered in Burns, Ore., on Monday for a local rally to tell the last few armed anti-government occupiers at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, and their supporters, to go home. Protests and pickets are a daily occurrence now in Burns, and they're spreading acro

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