Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 21, 2020 


U.S. intelligence has told lawmakers that Russia wants to see Trump reelected; and the Trump public charge rule takes effect Monday.

2020Talks - February 21, 2020 


Tomorrow are the Nevada caucuses, and Nevada Democrats are hoping for them to run far more smoothly than the ones in Iowa. Candidates battle for that top spot and voting continues.

Public News Service - OR: Toxics

Parents should avoid buying toys with strong magnets. According to OSPIRG, in just over a month, Portland doctors recently removed 54 magnets that had been ingested by four children. (OHSU)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Choking hazards, hidden toxins and privacy concerns are among the dangers toy buyers should watch out for as the holiday shopping season begins, according to an annual report. The 34th "Trouble in Toyland" report from the Oregon State Public Interest Research Group Foundation

A new report says pesticide runoff is poisoning Chinook salmon, a main food source for the Northwest's orcas. (Oregon State University/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The wide use of pesticides is pushing some species in Oregon and across the country to the brink. A new report from the Endangered Species Coalition highlights ten of the nearly 1,200 species imperiled by these chemicals. In the Northwest, pesticide runoff hampers the swimmi

A group of Lincoln County residents wanted to ban aerial use of pesticides, because its research determined aerial spraying was the most harmful. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – A grassroots effort in a seaside Oregon county last year could serve as an example for how other communities can beat large corporate interests. Last year, Lincoln County voters banned the aerial application of pesticides, despite opposition backing from companies like Monsan

The Siletz River Ecosystem in Lincoln County provides some of the drinking water for the county's residents. (osunikon/Flickr)

NEWPORT, Ore. – Can a river defend itself in court? On Monday, a judge in Newport will answer that question in the case of the Siletz River Ecosystem. Last May, Lincoln County residents approved a measure banning aerial pesticide spraying – a measure that stated the river had the "ri

Pesticides are usually sprayed from aircraft in the clear-cutting of forests near the Siletz River. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Siletz River ecosystem could take some novel legal action in an Oregon case over a measure banning aerial pesticides. In May, Lincoln County residents passed a measure outlawing the spraying of pesticides from aircraft. The measure is the first of its kind in the nation.

An EPA investigation into the use of pesticides near a California high school took 12 years to resolve. (Mr_Write/morguefile)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Despite more than 300 complaints that local environmental regulations have been discriminatory toward minority communities, the Environmental Protection Agency has never made a formal finding of a civil-rights violation. According to the Center for Public Integrity, none of the ei

Nearly 700,000 U.S. troops were involved in the first Gulf War. (PHC D. W. Holmes/US Navy)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the ceasefire that ended the first Gulf War. During the short conflict, nearly 700,000 U.S. troops were engaged. Dr. Ronald Grewenow, clinical director at the Portland Veteran Affairs Medical Center, says the war produced fewer physical injuri

The U.S. House and Senate finally update the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act to identify cancer-causing chemicals more quickly. (National Cancer Institute)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Today is World Cancer Day, and if you look around your house, you might find water bottles, canned food, and an old mattress contaminated with chemicals that could give you cancer. While some states have banned these potential cancer causers, federal agencies have had their hands

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