Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2019 


President Trump asks SCOTUS to block release of his tax returns; use of the death penalty is on the decline across the country; and a push to make nutrition part of the health-care debate.

2020Talks - November 15, 2019 


Former MA Gov. Deval Patrick is officially running for president, saying he can attract more Independents and moderate Republicans than other candidates.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Toxics

A new report says pesticide runoff is poisoning Chinook salmon, a main food source for the Northwest's orcas. (Oregon State University/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The wide use of pesticides is pushing some species in Oregon and across the country to the brink. A new report from the Endangered Species Coalition highlights ten of the nearly 1,200 species imperiled by these chemicals. In the Northwest, pesticide runoff hampers the swimmi

A group of Lincoln County residents wanted to ban aerial use of pesticides, because its research determined aerial spraying was the most harmful. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – A grassroots effort in a seaside Oregon county last year could serve as an example for how other communities can beat large corporate interests. Last year, Lincoln County voters banned the aerial application of pesticides, despite opposition backing from companies like Monsan

The Siletz River Ecosystem in Lincoln County provides some of the drinking water for the county's residents. (osunikon/Flickr)

NEWPORT, Ore. – Can a river defend itself in court? On Monday, a judge in Newport will answer that question in the case of the Siletz River Ecosystem. Last May, Lincoln County residents approved a measure banning aerial pesticide spraying – a measure that stated the river had the "ri

Pesticides are usually sprayed from aircraft in the clear-cutting of forests near the Siletz River. (Rio Davidson/Lincoln County Community Rights)

NEWPORT, Ore. – The Siletz River ecosystem could take some novel legal action in an Oregon case over a measure banning aerial pesticides. In May, Lincoln County residents passed a measure outlawing the spraying of pesticides from aircraft. The measure is the first of its kind in the nation.

An EPA investigation into the use of pesticides near a California high school took 12 years to resolve. (Mr_Write/morguefile)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Despite more than 300 complaints that local environmental regulations have been discriminatory toward minority communities, the Environmental Protection Agency has never made a formal finding of a civil-rights violation. According to the Center for Public Integrity, none of the ei

Nearly 700,000 U.S. troops were involved in the first Gulf War. (PHC D. W. Holmes/US Navy)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the ceasefire that ended the first Gulf War. During the short conflict, nearly 700,000 U.S. troops were engaged. Dr. Ronald Grewenow, clinical director at the Portland Veteran Affairs Medical Center, says the war produced fewer physical injuri

The U.S. House and Senate finally update the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act to identify cancer-causing chemicals more quickly. (National Cancer Institute)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Today is World Cancer Day, and if you look around your house, you might find water bottles, canned food, and an old mattress contaminated with chemicals that could give you cancer. While some states have banned these potential cancer causers, federal agencies have had their hands

Full page newspaper ads and a social media blitz are reminding Oregon lawmakers of one priority they didn't advance in the 2015 Legislature. Courtesy: Sierra Club

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Legislature doesn't start again for five months, but advocates for clean energy are already trying to get lawmakers' attention. The Sierra Club launched an Oregon ad campaign this week on social media and in some major newspapers, suggesting legislative leaders step up

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