Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 24, 2019 


The Supreme Court considers U.S. Census citizenship question – we have a pair of reports. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A look at how poor teacher pay and benefits can threaten preschoolers' success. And the Nevada Assembly votes to restore voting rights for people who've served their time in prison.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Youth

Twenty-one young people ages 8 to 19 are arguing that the U.S. government violated their rights by its failure to reduce the effects of climate change. (ItzaFineDay/flickr)

EUGENE, Ore. – A group of young plaintiffs is getting their day in court once again today in Eugene, arguing that the federal government's inaction on climate change is directly harming the well-being of America's youngest generation. The twenty-one plaintiffs range in age from 8 to 19 and are

Oregon ranks 35th in the nation for education funding. (Oregon Education Association)

SALEM, Ore. — Decades of shrinking budgets for Oregon's public schools has led to some of the largest class sizes and lowest graduation rates in the country, a new report says. Along with a statewide study of Oregon's many funding gaps in education, authors of the report at Oregon Education

Nearly two-thirds of Americans could be seen as financially illiterate, according to a new survey. (Ken Teegardin/Flickr)

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — Only one in three Americans is able to pass a financial literacy test, according to a new nationwide survey. Nearly two-thirds of participants struggled with concepts like budgeting, credit and long-term financial decision-making. Luke McMurray, assistant vice president of

Programs in Oregon are providing fresh produce to families during the summer months. (Oregon Food Bank)

PORTLAND, Ore. - Oregon families' meals are getting some added zest with fresh produce this summer. Oregon Food Bank's Harvest Share is giving out locally grown produce in Portland parks so that families can take it home and make healthy meals. Summer meal programs are particularly important for fam

One in seven Oregon households struggled to put food on the table at some point last year, according to a recent Gallup poll. (Melodi2/Morguefile)

PORTLAND, Ore. - One in seven households in Oregon struggled to afford food last year, according to a new survey conducted by Gallup. Although more than 14 percent of families still struggled with hunger at some point last year, the rate has been steadily decreasing since the Great Recession. In 201

An analysis from Salem found an initiative heading to the November ballot to tax large corporations would add $3 billion to Oregon's budget. (Shaundd/Wikimedia Commons)

SALEM, Ore. - A proposal heading to the November ballot would raise taxes on the largest corporations in Oregon in order to fund education, health care and senior services in the state. That proposal, Initiative Petition 28, would add $3 billion a year to the state's budget, according to an analysi

The Portland Public Schools Board gave the student-led group ALLY a victory when it approved ethnic studies courses in Portland high schools. (APANO)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The diverse history of the United States will reach Portland high school students in 2018, thanks to a resolution unanimously passed by the city's Public Schools Board this week. The student-led group Asian and Pacific Islander Leaders for the Liberation of Youth, or ALLY, l

Two bills concerning sexual assault await Gov. Kate Brown's signature. (Visitor7/Wikimedia Commons)

SALEM, Ore. - Oregon's 2016 legislative session has ended, leaving a stack of bills on Gov. Kate Brown's desk to be signed into law. Two of those bills address sexual assault. Senate Bill 1600 lifts the statute of limitations to prosecute first-degree sex crimes from its current 12-year limit. S

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