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PNS Daily News - December 11, 2019 


U.S. House to vote on two articles of impeachment; $1.4 trillion in planned oil & gas development said to put the world in a "a bright red level" of climate crisis; anti-protest legislation moving forward in Ohio; "forest farming" moving forward in Appalachia; and someone is putting cowboy hats on pigeons in Nevada.

2020Talks - December 11, 2019 


18 years ago today, China joined the WTO. Now, China's in a trade war with the U.S. Also, House Democrats and the Trump administration made a deal to move forward with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement.

Public News Service - OR: Oceans

A new report says pesticide runoff is poisoning Chinook salmon, a main food source for the Northwest's orcas. (Oregon State University/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The wide use of pesticides is pushing some species in Oregon and across the country to the brink. A new report from the Endangered Species Coalition highlights ten of the nearly 1,200 species imperiled by these chemicals. In the Northwest, pesticide runoff hampers the swimmi

The plastic in straws and other items breaks down in the ocean to small pieces that accumulate toxins. (Joel Bombardier/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. — An effort to ban plastic straws is sweeping the nation, and Portland is one of the latest cities to consider eliminating these single-use items. Last week, the city council voted to study ways in which the city can reduce use of non-recyclable plastics, specifically straws.

Oregon communities could start to feel the effects of ocean acidification if climate change isn't curbed, scientists say. (Plumbago/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Will the Trump administration's erasure of climate change references have consequences for the nation? A former government scientist says unequivocally yes. Rick Spinrad, former chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), says language is

Eastern Pacific leatherback sea turtle populations on the West Coast have decreased by more than 97 percent in the last three generations. (Bernard Dupont/Wikimedia Commons)

PORTLAND, Ore. – A new report highlights the ways politics are jeopardizing endangered animals and plants. In "Suppressed: How Politics Drowned Out Science for Ten Endangered Species," the Endangered Species Coalition and its partners say scientific guidance is going by the wayside under the

The Nature Conservancy is teaming up with a local land trust to protect part of Tillamook Head, a region identified as resilient as climate change worsens. (OCVA/Flickr)

SEASIDE, Ore. – As climate change worsens, certain landscapes could become refuges from the most dramatic effects to nature. One conservation group is looking to harness the power of those refuges by protecting lands that will be most resilient as global temperatures rise. The Nature Conserv

The steelhead count at Bonneville Dam is about half of the 10-year average for this time of year. (Peter Oelschlaeger/flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. - The number of steelhead making their way up the Columbia River and into its Northwest tributaries has fallen far below predictions this season. The migration of "A-run" steelhead from the ocean to freshwater is wrapping up through Bonneville Dam in the Columbia River Gorge, and the

Jordan Cove, above, is the potential site of a large liquefied natural gas terminal, which would have a capacity of 6 million tons annually. (Visitor7/Wikimedia Commons)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Residents of Coos Bay, Ore., who think a years-long fight over a liquefied natural-gas terminal is over might be wrong. A Canadian energy company backing the Jordan Cove terminal signed a preliminary deal last week with a Japanese power company, agreeing to purchase 1.5 milli

PHOTO: Some Northwest fishermen say the 'thrill of the catch' would be a lot less thrilling if coal shipments compromise air and water quality on the Columbia River. Photo credit: Nic Callero.

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Northwest fishing community says state and federal agencies ought to be trolling for a lot more information before allowing coal export terminals to be built along the coast. Fishermen are signing a petition that warns more coal could mean fewer fish and jobs in Oregon's

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