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PNS Daily Newscast - September 18, 2020 


A federal judge slams the brakes on U.S. Postal Service changes nationwide; and we take you to the state 'out front' for clean elections.


2020Talks - September 18, 2020 


Trump slams the 1619 project on Constitution Day, and Pennsylvania's Supreme Court makes some election changes.

Public News Service - OR: Oceans

Coastal-restoration projects in Oregon would improve watersheds for fish. (Joseph Hunkins/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Congress could fund restoration projects on the Oregon coast - and focus on rural communities that were left behind in the wake of the 2008 recession. Mark Trenholm, coast program director with the Wild Salmon Center, said the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2008 includ

A bill in Congress would create a $3 billion program for coastal restoration projects. (Iriana Shiyan/Adobe Stock)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Communities on the Oregon coast could see sorely needed investments from an infrastructure bill now in Congress. Jean Flemma, director of the Ocean Defense Initiative, said COVID-19 has hit the economies of coastal communities hard, with many fishing-related businesses losing thei

A polar bear sculpture made of trash that's washed up on Oregon beaches is on display at the Oregon Zoo in Portland. (washedashore.org)

BANDON, Ore. -- Researchers estimate 19 billion pounds of plastic get into the ocean each year. What washes back to shore could be trash -- or art. Bandon resident Angela Haseltine Pozzi founded the Washed Ashore Project 10 years ago. She says the nonprofit group has worked with more than 10,000

Eelgrass is critical habitat for juvenile crab and salmon. (David Ayers/U.S. Geological Survey)

COOS BAY, Ore. -- A natural gas terminal proposed for southern Oregon could endanger a sea plant critical to commercial fishing and ocean habitats, scientists say. Mike Graybill, a marine scientist in Coos Bay, said the forest of eelgrass in the area's tidal waters is crucial habitat for a variety

The low numbers of salmon returning to Northwest rivers are raising concerns about a future without these fish. (Bureau of Land Management/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Energy companies and conservation groups want to bridge the divide on a contentious issue in the Northwest: the future of four Snake River dams. This week, utilities and environmental groups came together to write an open letter to the governors of Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washi

A new report says pesticide runoff is poisoning Chinook salmon, a main food source for the Northwest's orcas. (Oregon State University/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The wide use of pesticides is pushing some species in Oregon and across the country to the brink. A new report from the Endangered Species Coalition highlights ten of the nearly 1,200 species imperiled by these chemicals. In the Northwest, pesticide runoff hampers the swimmi

The plastic in straws and other items breaks down in the ocean to small pieces that accumulate toxins. (Joel Bombardier/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. — An effort to ban plastic straws is sweeping the nation, and Portland is one of the latest cities to consider eliminating these single-use items. Last week, the city council voted to study ways in which the city can reduce use of non-recyclable plastics, specifically straws.

Oregon communities could start to feel the effects of ocean acidification if climate change isn't curbed, scientists say. (Plumbago/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Will the Trump administration's erasure of climate change references have consequences for the nation? A former government scientist says unequivocally yes. Rick Spinrad, former chief scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), says language is

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