Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - February 28 2020 


Coronavirus updates from coast to coast; and safety-net programs face deep cuts by Trump administration.

2020Talks - February 28, 2020 


Tomorrow are the South Carolina primaries, and former VP Joe Biden leads in the poll, followed by winner of the first three contests, Sen. Bernie Sanders and businessman Tom Steyer. Some Republican South Carolinians may vote for Sanders because they want closed primaries.

Public News Service - SD: Rural/Farming

A move to legalize growing and selling industrial hemp passes an important hurdle in South Dakota. (iStockphoto)

PIERRE, S.D. - A move to legalize growing and selling industrial hemp passed a hurdle in the South Dakota Legislature this week. A House committee approved a bill that would allow farmers to cultivate the plant, as long as it contains less than three-tenths of a percent of THC, the active ingredient

Bike safety groups want South Dakota lawmakers to consider new safety rules for all modes of transportation, not just cars. (iStockphoto)

PIERRE, S.D. – Some South Dakota bicyclists could face 30 days in jail and a $500 fine if a bill being considered today becomes law. The state's House Transportation Committee is scheduled to look over HB 1073. It would require that slow moving riders get off their bikes to make room for fas

The USDA is no longer enforcing its grass-fed livestock labels and some farmers say that could cause confusion for the marketplace. (MorgueFile.com/mensatic)

PIERRE, S.D. - This week the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced it will stop using labels for grass fed and naturally-raised livestock. The Department's Agricultural Marketing Service, or AMS, says it is no longer using those labels because it never had the authority to enforce them in the

USDA finds schools have a heavy influence in peoples' decisions to return to their small hometowns. Credit: Jerry Oster

WASHINGTON – A recent study released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service focused on towns that are losing population. It featured several in South Dakota and other states on the northern plains. Study co-author John Cromartie, a USDA geographer, travel

A new study has found that nitrogen run off from farm fields could come with a heavy price. Credit: Koan/morgueFile.com

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - Farm nitrogen pollution damage is estimated at billions of dollars annually, according to an International Scientific Team study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. The study shows agriculture accounts for most of the pollution, said Environmental Working Gr

The waiting game on a decision for Keystone XL is now at more than six years. Photo credit:

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - The waiting game on a decision for Keystone XL is now at more than six years, with supporters and foes wondering what is taking so long. The Trans-Canada pipeline project decision rests with the State Department, which has been conducting environmental reviews. Backers of the

Photo: A new study shows rural residents should call 911 if they think they are having a heart attack. Photo by GDNS

SSIOUX FALLS, S.D. - The natural instinct for many people in rural areas is to jump in the car and hurry to the nearest hospital if there are signs of a heart attack. A new study from the American Heart Association shows better outcomes from calling 911 and waiting for an ambulance. A review of mor

Photo: New proposals could limit who can get farm bill payments. Photo by GDNS.

YANKTON, S.D. - The U.S. Department of Agriculture wants to limit who can receive federal farm payments. The agency's newly-proposed rule would limit farm payments - people who may be designated as farm managers but are not actively engaged in farm operations would no longer receive them. In the F

5 of 20 pages   « First  <  3 4 5 6 7 >  Last »