Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 25, 2019 


Mueller clears Trump of coordinating with Russia, but leaves the door open to obstruction of justice. Also on the Monday rundown: A look at how federal food assistance helps people looking for work. Plus, are you driving a salvaged car?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - SD: Civic Engagement

A Lakota man locks himself to construction equipment in 2016 to protest construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. (en.wikipedia.org)

PIERRE, S.D. — Anti-pipeline-protest legislation that opponents say could chill free speech in South Dakota is on its way to Gov. Kristi Noem for a signature. The legislation was introduced by Noem days before the session ended - while many tribal members who opposed the bills were across the

The review website Senior List ranks South Dakota in third place, behind Iowa and Nebraska, among the safest states for older people. (Pixabay/cnort)<br />

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – Large or small, urban or rural, any community can strive to be more livable – and for the third year, AARP South Dakota is offering grants to help them achieve those goals. The grants are given for quick action projects through AARP's Community Challenge Grant initi

The 1890 Wounded Knee Massacre that left 250 Native American women and children dead is considered one of the most shameful episodes in U.S. history. (commons.wikimedia.org)

PIERRE, S.D. – A controversial tweet by President Donald Trump has led a Native American group to encourage Congress to rescind medals awarded to soldiers more than 100 years ago following the battle at Wounded Knee in southwestern South Dakota. And Four Winds Incorporated is urging Native A

South Dakota, where early voting started on Sept. 21, is one of 37 states and the District of Columbia that offer voting without requiring an absentee excuse or justification. (nativevillage.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Like many other states, South Dakota is expecting a larger than normal voter turnout for tomorrow's midterms, and the ACLU of South Dakota is stepping up to make sure voters can report any problems they encounter. As of Friday, the Secretary of State's office said nearly

In 2016, 72.6 percent of registered voters in South Dakota cast ballots, with the lowest voter turnout in rural counties, according to the South Dakota Secretary of State's office. (pbs.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – South Dakota voters age 50 and older will go to the polls next month concerned about elder financial abuse, improved transportation options, access to tele-health and quality home care services, among other issues. And they can learn more about how candidates in three maj

Since the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2010, the number of uninsured Americans has declined to 28.3 million from 48.6 million, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cahealthadvocates.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – As America's political divide sharpens, one issue most agree will be important at the ballot box next month is health care. In a CBS News poll conducted last month, 70 percent of Americans said they think health care is "very important," more so than any other top issue.

What will the 2018 midterm election bring? A Pew study found that, of the 92 million people who did not vote in 2016, the largest number said they “didn’t like the candidates or campaign issues.” (CyberTalk.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – Only 18 states and territories have requested on-site risk and vulnerability assessments of their voting systems, despite the midterm election approaching and repeated warnings those systems could be compromised. After hearing that, Sen. Mike Rounds of South Dakota, who s

The population of De Smet, S.D., declined more than 6 percent from 2010 to 2017, but the rural town raised money from local residents to expand the hospital and build an event center. (mapio.net)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – The population of rural counties in South Dakota continues to decline, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, but some rural towns are finding ways to boost resilience and keep young people from moving to larger cities. Jessica Schad, an assistant professor of Sociology and

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