Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 22, 2019 


President Trump rattles the Middle East, saying the U.S. will recognize Israel’s authority over the Golan Heights. Also on our Friday rundown: A judge blocks laws limiting the power of the new Wisconsin governor. Plus, momentum builds across party lines to abolish the death penalty.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - SD: Children's Issues

Homicide is the third-leading cause of death for Native American and indigenous Alaskan women ages 10-24, and the fifth-leading cause for women ages 25-34. (LorieShaull/Flickr)

PIERRE, S.D. – Murder rates for Native American women in some U.S. counties can be 10 times higher than the national average for all races, and legislation at the State Capitol could help create a database to track the issue. Rep. Tamara St. John is co-sponsoring Senate Bill 164. It directs

South Dakota is one of only a handful of states that doesn't provide state-funded preschool, but lawmakers have rejected legislation to study the issue for the second year in a row. (Twenty20)

PIERRE, S. D. – South Dakota educators fear there's growing inequality between kids who attend preschool programs and those who don't, but lawmakers could not be persuaded of that this legislative session. South Dakota is one of only seven states that doesn't provide state funding for prescho

A polygamist compound in the Black Hills may be empty, but state lawmakers are considering legislation that could be used to verify births and deaths there, should members of the sect return. (Wikimedia Commons)

PIERRE, S.D. - Occupants of a housing compound buried in the Black Hills and associated with a known polygamist sect are the focus of a bill in the South Dakota Legislature. The compound was established in 2005 by members of a radical offshoot of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, or

Nearly 90,000 South Dakotans received SNAP benefits in Nov. 2018, according to the South Dakota Department of Social Services. (nokidhungry.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – A new report shows more South Dakotans are relying on safety-net programs that help lower-income families. South Dakota's KIDS COUNT and the University of South Dakota's Public Health Programs analyzed enrollment for health and social-service programs since the Great Rece

The most recent data indicates $11,762 is spent nationally on public education per student, while South Dakota spends $9,176. (heartland.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – South Dakota's children attend school for 6-to-7 hours each day for 180 days a year, and it takes a dedicated contingent of specialists and support staff to help them learn, keep them safe, and provide experiences for successful adulthood. This is American Education Week,

South Dakota's two metropolitan areas are separated by 350 miles, which leaves 80 percent of the state lacking trained medical personnel to handle sexual assault cases. (wmky.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — South Dakota currently has only seven individuals who are certified to assist those who report a sexual assault, but a new training program has been launched to boost that number. Those who are certified have completed the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner, or SANE, program.

The hardest-to-fill teaching positions in South Dakota are in math, science, high school language arts, special education, career and technical education, and English as a second language. (teacher.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - South Dakota teachers no longer earn the lowest salaries in the nation, but a new report says that without vigilance, the progress could reverse itself and make it more difficult to retain good educators. This year, South Dakota teacher pay climbed to 48th among states - compare

Rural residents across America rely on Medicaid to get health coverage, at the same time Medicaid helps rural hospitals keep their doors open and provide health care and jobs. (evolutionnews.org)

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - South Dakota is not one of 33 states that expanded its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act, but a new report contends that if it had done so, more rural low-income residents would be covered by health insurance. The report from Georgetown University showed that states

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