Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 25, 2018 


President Trump scraps planned talks with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Also on our Friday rundown: California lawmakers support and emergency hotline for foster kids; and boating is a booming business in states like Minnesota.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - TN: Health Issues

Elizabeth Clarke of Unicoi County rings the victory bell at the Provision CARES Proton Therapy Center – a traditional rite of passage when patients complete their treatment. (Elizabeth Clarke)

ERWIN, Tenn. – There's one last hope for Tennesseans who might benefit from a state-of-the-art cancer treatment. Republican Gov. Bill Haslam vetoed the Cancer Patient Choice Act late last week, but there's talk of a possible special session to override his veto. The legislation would manda

Tennessee is leading many neighboring southern states in the reduction of opioid prescriptions and,  most recently, legislation to work to curb addiction. (Twenty20)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – This week, Tennessee stands out among many other states in the country – with the most comprehensive and restrictive laws around opioid prescriptions. The legislation (Senate Bill 2257/House Bill 1831) proposed by Gov. Bill Haslam in January became law this week and

Tennis star Serena Williams reportedly had problems getting doctors to take her medical issues seriously upon the birth of her child last year. (motivationforgood/Pixabay)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Black women are three to four times more likely to die during childbirth than white women. It's just one startling statistic that has prompted the creation of the nation's first "Black Maternal Health Week," which started on Wednesday. A group known as the Black Mamas Matt

There are more than 435,000 caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and related dementias in Tennessee. (Marianne/Flickr)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Thhe Tennessee General Assembly this week is expected to approve a resolution that would declare Alzheimer's disease and other related dementias a public health issue. The state ranks seventh in the country for Alzheimer's deaths. While Alzheimer's has long been viewed as an agin

Experts say that when touring a nursing home, pay attention to things such as the nurse-to-patient ratio, and the availability of information for residents. (Ulrich Joho/flickr)

LIMESTONE, Tenn. – This month, the Tennessee Department of Health suspended new admissions of residents at a Limestone, Tenn., nursing home – citing complaints made regarding nursing services, medical records and pharmaceutical services. But how do you know if you're placing your loved o

Insurance companies predict at least a 10 percent increase in health coverage costs after Congress did not include premium funding in its spending bill this week. (Pictures of Money/Flickr)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Will the tens of thousands of Tennesseans covered under the Affordable Care Act have coverage in future years? The answer is uncertain after a bill crafted by Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., failed to make it into the spending bill advanced in

TennCare recipients could be required to work in order to receive medical benefits, under bills in committee this week at the Tennessee Legislature. (Subconsci Productions/Flickr)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The idea of requiring TennCare recipients to work in order to receive benefits might sound like a reasonable proposal on its face. But opponents say there's a catch to the legislation, House Bill 1551, and its companion, Senate Bill 1728, sponsored respectively by Tennessee

A broken payment system may discourage insurers from enrolling millions of people who are uninsured, according to a report from the Urban Institute. (franchise opportunities/flickr)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Consumers who lose their health insurance coverage in the middle of the year may have a hard time finding information on coverage – and a new report from the Urban Institute says there's a good reason for that. One of the study authors Stan Dorn, now a senior fellow

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