Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 3, 2020 


Son-in-law Jared Kushner takes on a major role in Trump's fight with COVID-19. Also, emergency funding for people who can't pay their rent because of the pandemic.

2020Talks - April 3, 2020 


The Democratic National Committee delayed its July convention in Milwaukee until August. Wisconsin has a primary this Tuesday, but hasn't cancelled or delayed in-person voting like many other states have done.

Public News Service - TN: Health

More than 430,000 Tennesseeans are family caregivers for someone with Alzheimer's disease or dementia. But are they prepared for dealing with their loved one during the pandemic? (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- People with Alzheimer's and their caregivers face a unique set of challenges during the coronavirus pandemic. In Tennessee, more than 120,000 people age 65 or older are affected by Alzheimer's. While dementia itself doesn't increase risk for COVID-19 illness, experts say associ

According to state data, there are more than 16,000 advanced-practice registered nurses in Tennessee. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- State lawmakers are considering a bill that would remove physician oversight requirements for the state's advanced-practice registered nurses, or APRNs. Senate Bill 2110 is co-sponsored by two Republicans, Sen. Jon Lundberg of Bristol and Rep. Bob Ramsey of Maryville. Currentl

Many employers have turned to telecommuting as a way to curb the spread of the new coronavirus. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise, so does anxiety. Health professionals say social distancing, frequent hand washing for 20 seconds with hot, soapy water, and staying at home if you feel sick are especially critical to protecting the state's vulnerable population

The Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville. Gov. Bill Lee's second State of the State address focused on education, teacher pay and job creation. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Gov. Bill Lee addressed the 111th Tennessee General Assembly yesterday evening in a State of the State speech that focused primarily on education, while complimenting the state's Medicaid system as the most efficient in the country. But some health care experts said they disagr

A new proposed rule change by the U.S. Department of Agriculture would weaken school meal nutrition standards put into place in 2012. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a proposed rule change that would allow schools to serve fewer fruits and grains, and a smaller variety of vegetables. The change would roll back school nutrition standards put into place in 2012. Signe Anderson, director of nu

Tennessee ranks 41st in the country for female labor-force participation rates, according to the Institute for Women's Policy Research. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- A bill in Congress that would ensure pregnant women aren't fired from their jobs for requesting reasonable accommodations in the workplace has received bipartisan approval in the House Education and Labor Committee, and soon should move to the House floor for a vote. The Pregna

Research has shown pesticide exposure can cause birth defects, infertility and cancer. (Adobe Stock)<br />

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Environmental groups and public health experts are questioning the Environmental Protection Agency's frequent use of "emergency approvals" that allow farmers to use toxic pesticides. The EPA reports last year, it issued emergency approvals for use of a pesticide that is known to

U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facilities are hotbeds for potential flu epidemics. Children and older people are especially vulnerable. (Adobe Stock)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Peak flu season is here, when most people check in with their doctors about whether to get a flu shot. But for migrants being held in detention centers, that isn't an option – and U.S. Customs and Border Protection has refused to offer the flu vaccine to detainees. N

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