Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2019 


2020Talks - November 14, 2019 


It's World Diabetes Day, and health care, including the high cost of insulin and other drugs, is a top issue for many voters. Plus, do early states like Iowa and New Hampshire have an outsized role in the nomination process?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - TX: Public Lands/Wilderness

PHOTO: The gavel comes down Tuesday to open the 2015 Texas legislature, and a battle is brewing over the ability of local governments to set their own rules. Photo credit: Stuart Seeger/Flickr.

AUSTIN, Texas - Lawmakers convene at the state capitol in Austin today for the start of the 2015 legislature. Among the issues expected to be debated in this session is state versus local authority. Governor-elect Greg Abbott has proposed the elimination of what he calls a "patchwork quilt" of city

PHOTO: Texas is on the verge of receiving one billion dollars in damages stemming from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and the proper use of those funds is being called vital to the state's future ecology and economy. Photo credit: Stuart Seegar/Flickr.

GALVESTON, Texas - Fines paid by British oil giant BP in the wake of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will soon be flowing into Texas. Dozens of businesses and organizations say the state must focus the windfall on restoring wildlife habitat along the Gulf Coast. Texas is

PHOTO: Immigration is an important issue heading into the fall's election, but another key when it comes to Latino voters is the stance that candidates have on conservation issues. Photo credit: Rob Boudon/Flickr.
Available In Spanish

AUSTIN, Texas - As the mid-term elections approach, a new analysis shows that Latinos overwhelming support greater environmental protections, and such conservation issues could influence their voting decisions. The report is from the Hispanic Access Foundation. Its president, Maite Arce, said the r

PHOTO: A long-running legal battle over which water bodies are covered by the Clean Water Act could be coming to an end, with a proposed rule to provide clarity on which are eligible. Photo credit:  Robert Nunnally

AUSTIN, Texas - It's a plan to better protect the most vulnerable waters across the state and nation, and among those giving cheers are some Texas beer lovers. The proposed rule aims to end the long-running legal battle over how to apply the Clean Water Act by clearly defining which water bodies fa

PHOTO: Droughts driven by climate change are already threatening the reproductive health of ocelots and sea level rise is expected to wipe out some of the ocelot's coastal habitat. Photo credit: Mike Fisher

AUSTIN, Texas – As fans across Texas get ready to root on their favorite teams for March Madness, new research shows mascot namesakes, such as lions and tigers and bears, are facing real threats from climate change. Doug Inkley, a senior scientist with the National Wildlife Federation, says

PHOTO: A flock of around 300 whooping cranes is now returning to Texas for the winter after flying in from summer breeding grounds in Canada. CREDIT: Texas Parks and Wildlife

AUSTIN, Texas - The world's last flock of wild whooping cranes is now arriving in Texas, as the endangered birds make their annual winter migration to the coast from northern Canada. The flock has been growing slowly and it now numbers around 300 - despite the troubles of five years ago, recalled My

PHOTO: Day 30 of Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, 2010. CREDIT: Green Fire Productions

AUSTIN, Texas - The second phase of the trial over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico is in progress. This portion will include an attempt to determine just how much oil was spilled following the explosion and fire in 2010. According to Sara Gonzalez-Rothi Kronenthal, s

PHOTO: Texans are finding that keeping the lawn green can be an expensive proposition as mother nature has done little to help with the watering. But experts say by adding native species that are drought-resistant, folks can save money and keep the rivers flowing. CREDIT: Steven Polunsky

AUSTIN, Texas – With drought conditions persisting through the state, more Texans are discovering a solution in their backyards – and putting native plants into landscaping can pay off in more ways than one. Jennifer Ellis, senior project coordinator with the Texas Living Waters Projec

3 of 5 pages   « First  <  1 2 3 4 5 >  Last »