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PNS Daily Newscast - August 11, 2020 


Small business owners say postal delays make it harder to survive the pandemic; federal stimulus funding falls short for mental health treatment.


2020Talks - August 11, 2020 


Connecticut updates its election rules, and two Trump allies face off in Georgia's state runoff. Plus, a preview of next week's Democratic National Convention.

Public News Service - TX: Toxics

Chemical plants in Texas release tons of deadly toxins and carcinogens each year through breakdowns and maintenance errors, according to a new report. (DanielAzocar/iStockphoto)

AUSTIN, Texas - Preventable breakdowns and maintenance errors are causing chemical plants across Texas to spew tons of toxic substances into the air each year, according to a new report. The Environmental Integrity Project and Environment Texas report said that despite the release of deadly substan

View of lower Pine Spring Canyon and the Guadalupe Peak Trail from Hunter Peak in Guadalupe Mountains National Park. Texas is battling the EPA over regulations designed to control haze in the park. (National Park Service)

AUSTIN, Texas - The state of Texas has sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for rejecting the state's haze reduction plan for national parks in the far western parts of the state. The suit marks the 24th time Texas has brought legal action against the EPA over regulatory issues since Pre

Wild bee habitat is on the decline in many of the country's most important farmlands, according to a new report. (Derek Keats/Wikimedia Commons)

AUSTIN, Texas - Wild bee populations in the U.S. are disappearing in many of the country's most important farmlands, including West Texas, California's Central Valley, and the Great Plains and California's Central Valley according to a national study led by the University of Vermont. Taylor Ricke

Reproductive health physicians say increases in exposure to toxic chemicals over the last four decades is threatening human reproduction and health. Credit: Tomas Sereda/iStockphoto

AUSTIN, Texas - Dramatic increases in exposure to toxic chemicals over the last four decades is threatening human reproduction and health. That's according to a global federation of women's health physicians meeting in Vancouver, Canada this week. Tracey Woodruff is professor and director of the U

A new report from Greenpeace outlines how the world can transition away from fossil fuels to 100 percent renewable energy by the year 2050. Credit: Dmitry Rukhlenko/iStockphoto.

AUSTIN, Texas – The world can transition to 100 percent renewable energy by the year 2050, according to a new report from Greenpeace. The plan calls for phasing out oil and gas at a rate that matches the depletion of existing fields, and warns exploration for new fields should be seen as hig

Texas is on the hook to reduce carbon emissions from existing fossil fuel power plants. Credit: Larry D. Moore/Wikimedia Commons.

HOUSTON – The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has taken a significant step to slash carbon pollution with Monday's release of the Clean Power Plan. The plan calls for states to reduce emissions from power plants that burn fossil fuels by over 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. Juan Pa

Gulf Coast voters still concerned about the impacts of Deepwater Horizon spill. Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

AUSTIN, Texas - Voters along the Gulf Coast still are worried about the long-term impacts of the BP oil spill, and a majority want BP settlement money to pay for restoration and conservation projects, according to a new poll from the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership and The Nature Conser

Water use for hydraulic fracturing is increasing. Credit: U.S. Geological Survey.

AUSTIN, Texas - Water used for hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," is on the rise across the nation, according to a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey. The study found water use in horizontal drilling at gas wells was 28 times higher in 2014 than in 2000. Each gas well now taps over five m

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