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PNS Daily News - October 23, 2020 


President Trump and Joe Biden square off in their final debate; warnings that "dark days" of the pandemic are yet to come; and food assistance now available for some wildfire victims.


2020Talks - October 23, 2020 


The second and last presidential debate was much more controlled than the first; President Trump keeping to his main themes, calmly rebutted by Biden.

Public News Service - TX: Consumer

When the coronavirus hit in March, more than 12 million of the 55 million American students sent home did not have home broadband access for online learning, according to the Brookings Institute. (geralt/Pixabay)

AUSTIN, Texas -- The coronavirus pandemic has illustrated that every school needs 21st-century remote access to broadband, according to Connected Nation Texas. Jennifer Harris, the group's state program director, stressed that distance learning works when investments are made in home broadband, sc

Blacks and Hispanics in Texas, at a higher percentage than Whites, say the state government should address economic and living conditions as public health priorities. (gabrielberophs/Pixabay)

HOUSTON - To stay healthy, we're told to regularly see a doctor, but a new survey in Texas shows Blacks and Hispanics more than Whites believe nonmedical factors are equally important. Brian Sasser, chief communications officer with the Episcopal Health Foundation, said the survey showed the "live

The gap in equitable access to affordable postsecondary education across race and income levels is expected to worsen due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality and Lumina Foundation. (bls.gov)

AUSTIN, Texas -- Long before the COVID-19 pandemic, college students were derailed from graduating due to the high cost of housing, food and transportation. Now, a new study shows unexpected expenses often challenge older students to enroll and stay enrolled. Older students, defined as those ages

AARP says any attempt to put Social Security in jeopardy will be met with fierce opposition from its 38 million members. (Ellen26/Pixabay)

AUSTIN, Texas -- More than 3 million Texans rely on Social Security during retirement, and AARP is calling on people running for office to defend and protect its funding. AARP has sent a letter to President Donald Trump, asking him to outline a future funding plan. The letter follows the president

Since the federal legislation that prevented evictions expired in July, they have resumed in many parts of Texas. (calmatters.org)

AUSTIN, Texas -- The nation's economy has contracted at historic rates since the outset of COVID-19, and the outbreak has significantly harmed the finances of U.S. Hispanics, causing many to fear eviction may be next. The unemployment rate for Hispanics rose sharply, according to new data from the

Without Medicaid expansion and other statewide policy changes, the number of Texans without health insurance could increase to 5 million people next year, according to analysis by the Episcopal Health Foundation. (ernestoeslava/Pixabay)

AUSTIN, Texas -- A new analysis shows Texas can prevent a looming health care crisis if the state expands Medicaid and steps up efforts to enroll the newly jobless in health plans through the Affordable Care Act. Since the pandemic hit, more than 1.2 million Texans have lost their health insurance

Texas has promised to test more than 230,000 residents and staff at the state's 1,224 licensed nursing homes by the end of May. (sabinevanerp/Pixabay)

AUSTIN, Texas -- It's estimated that about half of the people who have died from COVID-19 have been nursing home residents, and senior advocates want Texas to tackle the crisis at every level of government. AARP Texas state director Tina Tran said local and state officials, along with Texas legisla

The Gulf of Mexico historically has been the largest producer of oysters in the nation. (photo-graphe/Pixabay)

HOUSTON -- The Texas oyster industry has struggled in recent years because of overfishing, hurricanes and floods, but a new program could be a boon for consumers and the Gulf economy. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission votes Thursday to adopt rules that govern how people are allowed to grow o

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