Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - UT: Rural/Farming

Almost one third of Utah's population lives in rural parts of the state, and will depend on a network of rural hospitals in case they are affected by the coronavirus pandemic. (SQuintans/AdobeStock)

SALT LAKE CITY - In the COVID-19 pandemic, where you live in Utah could be a major factor in your chances of surviving a bout of new coronavirus. Almost one-third of Utah's 3.2 million residents live outside of the Salt Lake City metro area and are served by a network of 21 rural hospitals and 14

The

SALT LAKE CITY – Proponents of a new statewide ballot initiative are in the signature-collecting phase, and say they hope to bring local control to the health care debate. The "Utah Decides Healthcare" proposal would expand Medicaid coverage to individuals and families in Utah with incomes be

County memberships in a group working to transfer public lands to states are on the decline. (Council of State Governments)

SALT LAKE CITY – County memberships in the American Lands Council, a national group working to transfer publicly owned lands to states, have dropped by as much as 45 percent, according to an investigation by the Western Values Project. Chris Saeger, Western Values Project director, suspects

Thursday marks the one-year anniversary of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's decision not to list the greater sage grouse as an endangered species. (USFWS)

SALT LAKE CITY – Today marks the one-year anniversary of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's landmark decision not to list the greater sage grouse as an endangered species. The bird, known for its colorful mating dance, once numbered as many as 16 million, but has dropped to between 200,000 a

A proposed water pipeline would transfer 86,000-acre feet of water a year from Lake Powell (above) for water customers in southwestern Utah. (JodiJacobson/iStockphoto)

SALT LAKE CITY - The State of Utah has filed for a permit to build a controversial 140-mile pipeline to send water from the Colorado River to southwestern Utah, but a coalition of conservation groups says its members will fight the project. The Lake Powell Pipeline could take up to 86,000 acre-fee

The EPA is treating some of the contaminated water from the Gold King Mine spill in containment ponds like this one. Courtesy: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

MONTICELLO, Utah – San Juan County in southeastern Utah is now feeling the impact of the Gold King Mine spill in southwestern Colorado, in which three million gallons of toxic sludge escaped into the Animas River. Part of the Colorado River system, the Animas is a tributary of the San Juan Ri

Grouse Creek, UT  Utah and other Western states could gain from expanded efforts involving farmers, ranchers and government agencies in Montana, working collaboratively to preserve habitat for the Greater sage-grouse, which faces a possible endangered species listing. Comments from Jason Weller, chief, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS); and Jay Tanner, rancher at Grouse Creek, Utah. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

GROUSE CREEK, Utah – Efforts underway in Montana to restore and protect habitat for sage-grouse, a bird that faces a possible endangered species listing, could benefit Utah and other Western states. Jason Weller, chief of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), met with Montana sta

Salt Lake City, UT - Farmers in Utah and around the country could benefit from a partnership involving U-S-D-A and NASA, which should lead to a better understanding of soil moisture levels as growers continue to deal with historic drought. Comments from Craig Gardner, farmer near Honeyville, Utah; and U.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Commerce.

SALT LAKE CITY - A partnership involving the U.S. Department of Agriculture and NASA could benefit farmers in Utah and elsewhere as the nation adjusts to the impact of climate change. U.S.D.A. Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden says the agreement will expand cooperation on space-borne remote sensing eff

1 of 3 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »