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2020Talks

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PNS Daily Newscast - June 18, 2021 


President Biden just signed a law declaring Juneteenth a federal holiday; and the first tropical storm system is forecast to make landfall in U.S. by end of the week.


2021Talks - June 18, 2021 


The U.S. marks a new national holiday; Republicans reject Sen. Joe Manchin's election reform compromise; and U.S. Supreme Court upholds Obamacare but strikes a blow to equal rights.

Public News Service - VA: Toxics

New Research says an EPA plan to reduce carbon emissions should actually cut electricity bills, if it means energy efficiency as well as renewables. Photo courtesy of World Resource Insitute.

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RICHMOND, Va. – An Environmental Protection Agency plan to cut carbon pollution should actually save Virginia families money, if meeting the plan includes energy efficiency, according to two separate analyses. Critics of the Clean Power Plan charge it will sharply raise the cost of electricit

PHOTO: Bob Keefe (center) with the nonpartisan small business group Environmental Entrepreneurs says the 210,000 comments from Virginians show strong support in the state for an EPA clean-power plan that would cut carbon pollution. Photo by Sarah Bucci, courtesy of Environment Virginia.

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RICHMOND, Va. – More than 200,000 Virginians have voiced their support for an Environmental Protection Agency plan to reduce carbon pollution linked to climate change. The comments were stacked in cases at the state Capitol Wednesday. Bob Keefe, executive director of the small business own

PHOTO: EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy unveiled a proposed rule to reduce carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants. Virginia would need to reduce it's emissions by 37 percent. Photo courtesy of the EPA.

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RICHMOND, Va. - The proposed rules for controlling carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants unveiled Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has ignited some fiery debate in coal country. Virginia is heavily dependent on coal for electricity, and supplies most of its own coal. To m

PHOTO: The coal industry is igniting debate in Virginia over EPA standards to limit an air pollution connection to climate change and health issues. Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons

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RICHMOND, Va. – The coal industry is igniting debate in Virginia over Environmental Protection Agency standards to limit air pollution connected to climate change and health issues. Virginians are seeing and hearing messages that those controls will mean higher electricity bills and other ec

PHOTO: Riverkeepers in Virginia and around the world are testing the waters for Swimmable Water Weekend, a global event to raise awareness of water quality and the impact of pollution. Photo credit: theswimguide.org

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RICHMOND, Va. – Can you swim in your local river or creek? Is there a safe beach? And if not, why not? Those are the questions riverkeepers want you to be asking as part of Swimmable Water Weekend this weekend. Peter Nichols, executive director of the environmental group Waterkeeper Alli

Windmill

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RICHMOND, Va. - Despite the fact that the coal and oil industries spent millions of dollars over the last election cycle to oppose clean-energy policies and candidates who support them, many candidates who favor clean-energy projects won or kept their seats. Among them are Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine an

Sun Covered with Soot

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RICHMOND, Va. - The public comment period has ended for the Soot Rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). So far, this rule has received more supportive comments from the general public than at any time in the agency's history. Peter Iwaowicz, the director of the Clean Air Campa

PHOTO: Over three million people have written letters to EPA asking for strong national limits for new coal-fired power plants.   2010 Microsoft Corporation

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HERNDON, Va. - Three million Americans have written comments asking the Environmental Protection Agency to implement tougher national standards to limit industrial carbon pollution from new coal-fired power plants. Margie Alt, executive director of Environment America, one of the groups that organi

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