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PNS Daily Newscast - August 22, 2018 


Manafort and Cohen guilty as charged. Also on the Wednesday rundown: federal figures predict little boost to coal jobs; the EPA admits new coal rules endanger health; and it turns out consumer want better MPG despite Trump fuel standard rollbacks.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - VA: Youth Issues

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has found children who are eligible for Medicaid health coverage miss fewer school days because of illness or injury. (Pixabay)

BRISTOL, Va. – Teachers and education advocates say Virginia's move to expand Medicaid is not just important to the 400,000 low-income people now eligible for health care, but it's also a big win for students and public schools. The switch to draw down federal dollars to help cover the unins

Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of acute and chronic illness globally, in America, and in Virginia, according to the Virginia Department of Health. (Pixabay)

RICHMOND, Va. — The expansion of Medicaid in Virginia is a huge boost to those with cardiovascular disease, one of the top causes of death in the state. After four years of back-and-forth over the expansion, Gov. Northam is expected to sign the state budget Thursday that would extend health

Members of the Virginia Education Association's Underrepresented Male Educators Symposium discuss recruitment strategies. (Virginia Education Association)

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — There are twice as many students of color, by percentage, as teachers of color in Virginia's public schools. What's more, the Commonwealth has the fewest male teachers, proportionately, of any state in the U.S. The Virginia Education Association recently gathered educa

Data from The Annie E. Casey Foundation shows that locking up juvenile offenders when they are not really a threat can change the young person for life. (Richard Ross/AECF)

RICHMOND, Va. – A program to help keep juvenile offenders out of pre-trial detention is showing big results for Virginia. The state and some local jurisdictions have worked with The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative since 2003. Beth Stinnett, program ma

Toney McNair, Virginia's 2017 Teacher of the Year, says state lawmakers could be doing more to help educators make a difference in the students' lives. (Virginia Education Assn.)

RICHMOND, Va. – Virginia's Teacher of the Year says connecting with students is a calling, even an assignment for him, and he says lawmakers should provide the resources needed to help. The General Assembly is debating Gov. Terry McAuliffe's budget plan, including the first statewide teacher p

Virginia educators say some of the public ed progress made in the state may be at risk in the presidential election. (Woodleywonderworks/Flickr)

RICHMOND, Va. – State educators say Virginia public education has a lot at risk in the presidential election. Last year, President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), a replacement for the previous No Child Left Behind. But Jim Livingston, president of the Virginia Education A

A new report finds young offenders spend longer locked up because of court fines and fees. (Juvenile Law Center)

RICHMOND, Va. - Young people in Virginia's juvenile-justice system often end up jailed longer because of their inability to pay fines and court fees, according to a new analysis by the Juvenile Law Center. Its report, "Debtors' Prison for Kids," found that many young offenders stay locked up or on

The Virginia Education Association has some good ideas for parents as they help their kids face the new school year. (Martin Vorel/Libreshot)

RICHMOND, Va. — If your child is nervous about going back to school, Virginia teachers have some good ideas to help turn those nerves into excitement. Jim Livingston, president of the Virginia Education Association and long-time middle school math teacher said it's important that parents set

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