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PNS Daily Newscast - July 23, 2019 


A bipartisan deal reached to avert U.S. government default. Also on our Tuesday rundown: a new report calculates the high hospital costs for employers. Plus, new legislation could help protect Florida's at-risk wildlife.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - VA: Criminal Justice

Many Virginia cities and counties began researching a decade ago to create programs to divert people with mental illnesses from incarceration. (Adobe Stock)

ARLINGTON, Va. — Arlington County will hold a meeting this week to get public input on a new program designed to offer those with mental illnesses treatment instead of jail time when they're arrested. The idea behind what's known as "mental health court" is to waive incarceration if a person

Refusal of treatment for serious medical needs is

RICHMOND, Va. — After being refused the most up-to-date medical care for Hepatitis C while incarcerated at the Buckingham Correctional Center, Elmo Augustus Reid now is receiving potentially life-saving treatment thanks to a recent victory in court. As many as 60 percent of people in Virgini

Alexei Wood is the only journalist still facing felony charges after being swept up in the arrests of rioters at President Donald Trump's inauguration. (Alexei Wood/Youtube)

RICHMOND, Va. – Press groups and photojournalist Alexei Wood say there are troubling implications to Wood's trial on charges of multiple felonies. Wood stands charged with six felonies and two misdemeanors in a Washington, D.C. Superior Court. He says the video he shot of rioting during Pr

Data from The Annie E. Casey Foundation shows that locking up juvenile offenders when they are not really a threat can change the young person for life. (Richard Ross/AECF)

RICHMOND, Va. – A program to help keep juvenile offenders out of pre-trial detention is showing big results for Virginia. The state and some local jurisdictions have worked with The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative since 2003. Beth Stinnett, program ma

The family of Jamycheal Mitchell say they have been gratified to see mental-health reforms move through the legislature this year. (the Mitchell family/Youtube)

RICHMOND, Va. -- The state's General Assembly has taken a number of steps to strengthen Virginia's mental health services. And the family of Jamycheal Mitchell has said it was deeply gratifying to see the reforms. Mitchell was the young mentally ill man who was arrested for stealing $5 worth of sn

A new report finds young offenders spend longer locked up because of court fines and fees. (Juvenile Law Center)

RICHMOND, Va. - Young people in Virginia's juvenile-justice system often end up jailed longer because of their inability to pay fines and court fees, according to a new analysis by the Juvenile Law Center. Its report, "Debtors' Prison for Kids," found that many young offenders stay locked up or on

As Gov. Terry McAuliffe signs orders restoring voting rights to reformed Virginia felons, many are questioning the law making that necessary. (Michaele White/Governor's Office/Flickr)

RICHMOND, Va. – Critics of Virginia's law that makes it hard for reformed felons to vote call it backward and discriminatory. That includes Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who says he'll sign thousands of individual orders restoring voting rights for felons who have finished their sentences. U.S. Se

According to a new survey, U.S. jails hold ten times more mentally ill individuals than hospitals. Jamycheal Mitchell died in jail after being arrested for stealing five dollars worth of snacks. (Youtube/the Mitchell family)

RICHMOND, Va. -- U.S. jails are overrun with mentally ill inmates and are ill-equipped to deal with the problem, according to a recent survey of corrections staff. The study found that on average 16 percent of prisoners in the U.S. correctional system are seriously mentally ill. The study’s

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