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PNS Daily Newscast - August 13, 2020 


Minutes after Biden selected Harris as VP, she throws first punch at Trump; teachers raise their hands with safety concerns.


2020Talks - August 13, 2020 


Joe Biden and Kamala Harris make their first public appearance as running mates. President Trump calls Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene a GOP "star," despite her support for conspiracy theory QAnon.

Public News Service - WA: Environment

The sockeye salmon runs of Bristol Bay, Alaska, are world-renowned. (BB Armstrong/The Nature Conservancy)

SEATTLE - Conservation, tribal and fishing groups are condemning the Army Corps of Engineers' recommendation to permit the Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska. The groups said the open-pit mine operation would have dire consequences for some the world's most productive salmon streams. Steve Cohn, d

The Nooksack River is crucial salmon habitat for the Northwest. (Patrick McNall/Flickr)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. -- Construction crews have begun work to remove the Middle Fork Nooksack Dam near Bellingham, restoring a crucial river for salmon. The project is decades in the making and is critical as fish species in the Northwest dwindle. Steven Day, project engineer for the City of Bellin

The Washington State Department of Transportation has completed a wildlife crossing on I-90 near Snoqualmie Pass. (WSDOT/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- The perils of traffic aren't just a human concern. Wildlife advocates say animals need highway crossings to survive. Mitch Friedman's organization Conservation Northwest was integral in developing a wildlife crossing project on I-90 east of Snoqualmie Pass. "If we don't provide ways fo

Natural solutions like fuels reduction and prescribed burns could reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, according to a new report. (Ben Brooks/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- A new report outlines how the best protections from natural disasters could come from nature itself. The report, "The Protective Value of Nature" from The National Wildlife Federation and Allied World Assurance Company Holdings, evaluates natural systems such as wetlands and forests, a

Washington state has created a map that breaks down racial health disparities due to environmental conditions. (Washington State Department of Health)

SEATTLE -- Environmental groups are joining the chorus of voices denouncing police brutality in the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of police in in Minneapolis. Some see environmental harm and police violence aimed at communities of color as inseparable issues. Research finds communiti

Researchers at Washington State University are studying a protein that could make plants more tolerant to drought. (Scott/Adobe Stock)

SPOKANE, Wash. - Researchers at Washington State University may have found a way to help crops adapt to a warming climate. Phytologist Karen Sanguinet - an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at WSU - is studying a protein that she says could help plants move water more

In Seattle's South Park neighborhood, a cleanup coalition formed after the Duwamish River was declared a Superfund site in 2001. (Jovelle Tamayo/YES! Media)

By Lornet Turnbull for Yes! Broadcast version by Eric Tegethoff for Public News Service Reporting for the YES! Magazine Media-Washington News Service SEATTLE -- When Seattle Public Schools announced it was suspending classes in response to the coronavirus outbreak, Lashanna Williams naturally thoug

While most Washington state Department of Ecology staff is telecommuting, its spill response team still is on the ground and in waterways. (Des Runyan/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- The Washington state Department of Ecology is making clear it won't give any slack on environmental regulations, despite the Environmental Protection Agency relaxing rules during the pandemic. The department is exercising "reasonable discretion" in pursuing violations, but says it's still

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