Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 5, 2020 


It will likely take donations to help the Twin Cities recover from damage by looters; and state and local governments look for relief in next stimulus bill.

2020Talks - June 5, 2020 


Democrats and Republicans have had drastically different responses to President Trump's militarized response to protests in the nation's capital. And, new electoral maps will be drawn next year, some by legislatures and others by outside entities.

Public News Service - WA: Environment

Dwindling salmon numbers in the Pacific Northwest have hit Southern Resident orca populations hard. (j.c. winkler/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Energy companies and conservation groups want to bridge the divide on a contentious issue in the Northwest: the future of four Snake River dams. This week, utilities and environmental groups came together to write an open letter to the governors of Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington,

Built during World War II, the B Reactor at the Hanford Site was the first large-scale nuclear reactor ever built. (Energy.gov/Wikimedia Commons)

RICHLAND, Wash. -- The federal government still has not addressed the aging facilities at one of North America's most contaminated nuclear sites. That's according to the Government Accountability Office, now slamming the Department of Energy's response to a 2017 tunnel collapse at the Hanford Nuclea

Lawmakers in Olympia are considering a bill that would regulate water-rights sales to water banks. (Steve Voght/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash -- Washington state lawmakers are taking up an issue that has vexed western states for decades - how to manage water resources. They want to tackle water speculation, which is squeezing some users. The concern is mostly about who owns water banks, which collect water rights from land

Repair and maintenance costs in Washington state's national parks exceed $420 million. (Jonathan Miske/Flickr)

SEATTLE - With a divisive impeachment trial over, advocates for public parks are hoping Congress can focus now on an issue with bipartisan support - national parks. The Restore Our Parks and Public Lands Act would fund repairs sorely needed in the country's national park system. Deferred maintenan

Wildfire smoke is a major health and climate concern across Washington state. (NASA Earth Observatory/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - With the threat of wildfires looming larger, 2020 could be the year Washington state provides funding solely for preparing for them. The state's Department of Natural Resources is urging lawmakers to create a Wildfire Prevention and Preparedness Account, which would provide more t

Washingtonians at a public meeting on a Puget Sound clean-fuel standard noted the region's leadership tackling climate change. (Washington Environmental Council)

SEATTLE - The Puget Sound region has proposed cutting emissions from its biggest greenhouse gas source - the transportation sector. Public comment on a new Clean Fuel Standard ends Jan. 6. The Puget Sound Clean Air Agency rule aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transportation by 26% by

Gov.Inslee's Southern Resident Orca Task Force has recommended considering the impacts of four lower Snake River dams on salmon populations. (Bonneville Power/Flickr)

SEATTLE - A report on the future of the Snake River in southeast Washington comes out today. The Lower Snake River Dams Stakeholder draft report relies on perspectives from more than 100 stakeholders and more than 3,500 online responders. While there are no recommendations, it could be an influent

Avista is one of six owners in the Montana-based Colstrip power plant, the largest greenhouse-gas emitter west of the Mississippi River. (Rachel Cernansky/Flickr)

SPOKANE, Wash. – An eastern Washington utility is cutting its reliance on coal in exchange for more renewable energy sources. Avista has decided not to support any investments that extend Montana's Colstrip power plant past 2025. Colstrip is the largest emitter of greenhouse gases west of th

2 of 45 pages   « First  <  1 2 3 4 >  Last »