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PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2018 


Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Health Issues

Gaming disorder is associated with other disorders such as depression, anxiety and ADHD.(superanton/Pixabay)

SEATTLE - A psychiatrist in the Evergreen State says it's important that the World Health Organization is recognizing online gaming addiction as a disorder, but more research is needed to fully understand and treat it. The American Psychiatric Association has yet to recognize gaming disorder, notin

President Donald Trump has promised to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy with a Supreme Court pick who will overturn Roe v. Wade. (trac1/Twenty20)

SEATTLE — Supporters of women's rights say developments at the U.S. Supreme Court are putting the future of reproductive rights in peril. Last week, the court ruled in a 5-4 decision that so-called crisis pregnancy centers run by anti-abortion groups cannot be compelled by states to post inf

Doctors suggest even men without any serious health conditions come in for routine health checkups. (RLTheis/Twenty20)

SEATTLE – There's a good chance Washington dads haven't been in for a routine doctor's checkup in a while. For Father's Day, medical professionals suggest dads get themselves a gift and go in for an exam, even if they don't have any pressing health issues. Doctor Scott Itano, a family medici

Free summer meal programs are helping working families, who spend an extra $300 on food when school is out. (School's Out Washington)

SEATTLE – Summer break is approaching in Washington state, which also means many families can't rely on school for a meal during the day. Schools and summer programs will be stepping up to fill the gap with free summer meals. Marci Asher is the executive director of the Urban Family Center i

The harmful effects of excessive formaldehyde in wood products came into sharp focus in FEMA trailers after Hurricane Katrina. (Infrogmation/Wikimedia Commons)

SEATTLE – A new rule put in place by the Environmental Protection Agency this month will protect consumers from formaldehyde in wood products. Formaldehyde is used to bind wood in products such as cabinets, flooring and even RV paneling. However, excessive use of the product can hurt people'

About 25 percent of the calories consumed globally come from rice, which is under threat from rising carbon dioxide levels. (Calmuziclover/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Rice is an important source of nutrients for billions of people around the world, but it could lose some of its key health benefits as carbon dioxide levels continue to rise. Researchers found rice is sapped of essential B vitamins when concentrations of the most common greenhouse

An Environmental Impact Statement from the Washington State Department of Ecology says a proposed coal terminal would require 16 more trains per day. (Darin Moulton/Flickr)

LONGVIEW, Wash. – Six states have joined the battle over a massive coal export terminal proposed in Washington state. The Millennium Bulk Terminal in Longview would have been the largest in the country but was denied several key permits by state officials last year. Wyoming, Montana, Kansas,

King County partners with Choose 180, a diversion program for youths charged with low-level crimes. (Choose 180)

SEATTLE – This month, King County announced it's in the process of moving juvenile justice to its public health division. What does this actually mean for young people and communities in the Seattle area? Sean Goode is the executive director of Choose 180, a diversion program for youths char

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