Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 27, 2020 


The U.S. now has more confirmed coronavirus cases than any other country. Despite the pandemic, Election 2020 continues and states are making changes.

2020Talks - March 27, 2020 


3.3 million people reported being jobless last week, according to new Labor Department numbers. And Puerto Rico was supposed to hold primaries this weekend, though they pushed it back to late April, because of COVID-19.

Public News Service - WA: Health

Health experts want educators and school staff to consider self-care practices to reduce stress from their demanding work. (Kaiser Permanente)

SEATTLE – Students are back in school and, while much of the education focus is on children, staff members also are back at work – and they're feeling the stress of the job. According to a Gallup poll, 46% of teachers feel high daily stress, which ties them with nurses for the most in

The annual cost of the name-brand cancer-treating drug REVLIMID rose roughly $100,000 between 2012 and 2017. (Burlingham/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE — New research shows the rising cost of prescription drugs is harming the Washingtonians who need them most. The average annual cost of prescription drugs grew 57% between 2012 and 2017, according to data compiled by AARP Washington. Over that same period, annual incomes in the state

Nearly half of all Americans have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association. (rawpixel/Pixabay)

SPOKANE, Wash. – A new study finds treating high blood pressure could slow the brain's decline as people age. Columbia University researchers analyzed data from 11,000 adults in the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. They found patients ages 55 and older with blood pressure abov

A new Meds-First Initiative to treat opioid addiction will set up clinics in North Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma and Walla Walla. (goodluz/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE — Four sites in Washington are piloting an underutilized but proven approach to treating opioid addiction. The Meds-First Initiative will rely on medication-assisted treatment clinics to administer prescription drugs like buprenorphine, which blocks opioid cravings and has been shown

Members of the military aren't able to sue in cases of medical negligence because of a 1950 U.S. Supreme Court decision. (U.S. State Department/Flickr)

SEATTLE – Congress's defense spending package could provide military service members and their families more legal protections. The House-passed version of the National Defense Authorization Act includes provisions that ban forced arbitration clauses so service members can take consumer and

Clinics in schools that can address both physical and mental-health issues can lower absenteeism and improve student outcomes. (Leonid/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE - Some Washington state students going back to school this year will have more than a school nurse as a health resource. School-based health centers provide a variety of care, including mental-health therapy, physical exams and even dental care. The clinics already are prominent in King Cou

Nearly three-quarters of western Washington municipalities are making progress toward controlling polluting stormwater runoff. (Seattle.gov)

SEATTLE – After years of work, cities in Washington are doing more to protect Puget Sound from its biggest source of pollution: stormwater runoff. A report from the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance and Washington Environmental Council helped motivate them. In 2017, the groups released their prog

The darker shades on the map represent the highest shaking hazard and the black lines represent potentially active faults in Washington. (Washington state Department of Natural Resources)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Ground-shaking new research finds many Washington state public schools are at high risk of serious damage in an earthquake. The Washington Geologic Survey's School Seismic Safety Project looked at 222 schools across the state, or about 5% of the total. It found that in a m

4 of 44 pages   « First  <  2 3 4 5 6 >  Last »