Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 7, 2020 


The U.S. Supreme Court rules against rogue 2016 Electoral College voters; SBA pandemic aid goes to companies that don't pledge to save or create jobs.

2020Talks - July 7, 2020 


Biden's climate change task force is making some progress; a federal judge orders the Dakota Access Pipeline shut down; and today sees elections in NJ and DE.

Public News Service - WA: Health

Workers at seven fruit-packing companies in the Yakima Valley are on strike. (Edgar Franks/Familias Unidas por la Justicia)

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Farm and fruit-packing workers are considered essential. And in Washington state, they're roiled in struggles for better working conditions. Yakima County is the biggest hotspot for coronavirus cases on the West Coast, and the fruit-packing warehouses in the area have been a vecto

Jose Atil is a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver, Wash., and also works at Camp Evergreen, a day care program for the children of first responders. (PSE SEIU Local 1948)

SEATTLE -- The U.S. House of Representatives has approved the next round of coronavirus relief, and some essential workers in Washington state are watching the bill closely. Jose Atil, a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver and a member of the Public School Employees of Washingt

University of Washington workers say they need more Plexiglas barriers in the hospitals. (Justin Lee/Washington Federation of State Employees)

SEATTLE -- University of Washington hospital workers are feeling vulnerable as the state inches back to normal. Custodial staff at Harborview Medical Center and UW Medical Center say they need more protective gear and safety measures in place. Paula Lukaszek, a plumber at UW and president of the Am

One scam popping up recently claims there is a vaccine or treatment for coronavirus. (MUHAMMADROHAIZAD/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- Scammers are taking advantage of Americans' heightened state of anxiety during the coronavirus pandemic. Kay Tomlinson is a fraud-prevention specialist in Washington state with the AARP Fraud Watch Network. She said there are a variety of scams circulating right now, including "can't-mi

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, made more timely by the stresses of the coronavirus outbreak. (ipopba/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- The coronavirus pandemic and stay-at-home orders are increasing the need for mental health resources. To protect folks from the virus, one health care provider is supporting them at a safe distance with a digital resource at no cost to members. The app, MyStrength, is now available fr

The decrease in youth detention rates over the last month has been as dramatic as the reduction rate from 2010 to 2017 at detention centers in 30 states. (pixelcarpenter/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- The number of young people in detention centers has decreased dramatically since the coronavirus outbreak began, according to a new survey. Data from The Annie E. Casey Foundation, collected from centers in 30 states, including Washington, finds populations decreased by nearly one-quart

Seattle Public Library branches are beginning to allow access to their restrooms. (RAMIRO/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Libraries across Washington continue to serve communities despite having to close their doors during the coronavirus outbreak. Pierce County Library System Executive Director Georgia Lomax says libraries are still performing many of the essential services they were before COVID-19, from

More cuts in spending are likely in Washington state as the financial fallout from COVID-19 continues. (Jim Bowen/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Washington state community and technical college employees fear budget cuts could be coming as COVID-19 rocks the state coffers. Already, Gov. Jay Inslee has vetoed an expected $445 million in future spending through 2023, with some of those cuts coming to education. American Federati

2 of 47 pages   « First  <  1 2 3 4 >  Last »