Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 10, 2020 


The Supreme Court opens the door for prosecutors to seek President Trump's financial records; a backlash in Florida on school reopening plans.

2020Talks - July 10, 2020 


US Supreme Court rules on Trump's tax returns; Houston mayor cancels Texas GOP's in-person convention; Louisiana has elections; and DC council gives people incarcerated for felonies the right to vote.

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

Commercial and recreational fishing supports about 60,000 jobs on the Washington coast. (Bill Perry/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- An infrastructure bill in Congress would give a big boost to restoration projects along the Washington coast. Dr. Erin Meyer, director of conservation programs and partnerships at the Seattle Aquarium, said investments in the coast would benefit the habitats of endangered fish species su

With states looking at budget shortfalls because of COVID-19, public workers could be the first to suffer from cuts. (peuceta/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- Union workers say it's time for Congress to support public-sector workers and pass the HEROES Act. The $3 trillion coronavirus stimulus legislation passed in the House in May would provide $875 billion to state and local governments, which have been hit hard by COVID-19. Carissa Hahn is

More than 100 Tacoma paraeducators will have their hours reduced so much in the new school year that they will no longer be eligible for health insurance. (NeONBRAND/Unsplash)

TACOMA, Wash. -- Tacoma schools plan to cut or reduce the hours of hundreds of educators who work with the most vulnerable students. More than 400 paraeducators will be laid off, transferred or have their work hours cut in the fall. Glory Tichy, president of the Tacoma Federation of Paraeducators,

Workers are on strike at four of the six fruit packing warehouses in Yakima Valley. (Shauri Tello)

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Workers in Yakima's fruit packing warehouses are mourning the loss of a colleague to COVID-19. The virus has hit Yakima County hard, prompting workers at six fruit companies to strike for better conditions over the past few weeks. David Cruz, who worked at Allan Brothers Fruit f

Hispanic and African-American populations in King County make up a disproportionate number of confirmed coronavirus cases. (H_Ko/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- While cases of coronavirus are going down in Washington state, racial disparities increasingly are being laid bare. According to the Washington State Department of Health, white people are 68% of the state's population, but make up 43% of cases. Meanwhile, 13% of the state is Hispanic,

Workers at seven fruit-packing companies in the Yakima Valley are on strike. (Edgar Franks/Familias Unidas por la Justicia)

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Farm and fruit-packing workers are considered essential. And in Washington state, they're roiled in struggles for better working conditions. Yakima County is the biggest hotspot for coronavirus cases on the West Coast, and the fruit-packing warehouses in the area have been a vecto

Jose Atil is a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver, Wash., and also works at Camp Evergreen, a day care program for the children of first responders. (PSE SEIU Local 1948)

SEATTLE -- The U.S. House of Representatives has approved the next round of coronavirus relief, and some essential workers in Washington state are watching the bill closely. Jose Atil, a paraeducator for English language learners in Vancouver and a member of the Public School Employees of Washingt

University of Washington workers say they need more Plexiglas barriers in the hospitals. (Justin Lee/Washington Federation of State Employees)

SEATTLE -- University of Washington hospital workers are feeling vulnerable as the state inches back to normal. Custodial staff at Harborview Medical Center and UW Medical Center say they need more protective gear and safety measures in place. Paula Lukaszek, a plumber at UW and president of the Am

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