Newscasts

PNS Daily News - September 16, 2019 


New allegations emerge against Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh; and a new report says a lightning strike is more likely than a forced arbitration win.

2020Talks - September 16, 2019. (3 min.)  


2020 presidential hopefuls tweet about more sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and Democrats who didn't make it onto last week's debate stage continue their grassroots approaches.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Livable Wages/Working Families

About 60 million workers are subject to forced arbitration clauses, but only 282 won monetary compensation between 2014-2018, according to the American Association for Justice. (designer491/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE — Tens of millions of workers and consumers have signed agreements to not sue companies and instead settle through arbitration. But a new report says they're more likely to be struck by lightning than to win a case through the so-called forced arbitration process. The American Associ

Tuition at Washington state's four-year universities is more than three times higher than it was five decades ago. (Africa Studio/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE - College students heading back to Washington classrooms continue to face a challenge their parents likely did not: high tuition costs. Although costs have dipped slightly since 2012, they're still far higher than in 1965. Aaron Keating, managing director of the Economic Opportunity Institu

Washington is the third-most unionized state in the country. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)

SEATTLE — More than a year after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling some thought would deal a major blow to unions, the organizations show no signs of slowing down in Washington state. The 2018 decision on Janus v. AFSCME had the potential to cut off one revenue stream to public unions: it allowed em

The ratio of CEO-to-worker compensation is 4.7 times greater than it was 30 years ago. (Hyejin Kang/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – A new analysis finds pay to CEOs is ballooning while average wages for workers remain stagnant. The Economic Policy Institute looked at compensation for CEOs at the 350 largest firms in the U.S. and found they have risen more than 1,000% over the past four decades. Meanwhile, pay

The Farmworker March for Dignity will start at a Customs and Border Patrol station in Ferndale, Wash. (Edgar Franks/Community to Community Development)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. – Farmworkers and their supporters are marching in northern Washington this weekend. Environmental and racial justice groups will walk alongside laborers in Bellingham for the 2019 March for Dignity. Rosalinda Guillen, executive director of the farmworkers' rights group Comm

Washington state lawmakers passed 11 tax bills this session to increase the state's revenue. (Jim Bowen/Flickr)

SEATTLE — A proposed ballot initiative that would void taxes approved by the Washington State legislature unless voters gave their stamp of approval within a year of their adoption has today to submit 260,000 valid signatures in order to get on November's ballot itself. I-1648 targets 11 tax

The Annie E. Casey Foundation places Washington state 29th in education in its annual report. (Annie E. Casey Foundation)

SEATTLE – Washington state still has more progress to make on child well-being, according to a new report. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2019 KIDS COUNT Data Book ranks the Evergreen State 16th overall in its measure of how children are doing in four categories: economic well-being, educat

Health-care workers face a higher rate of violence on the job than most other employment sectors. Some in Congress say OSHA should do more to address it. (sudok1/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – A bill in Congress to address workplace violence for health-care and social-service workers is moving closer to a vote in the House. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration finds health-care workers were four times more likely than average private-sector workers to face v

1 of 45 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »