PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 8, 2021 


Nationwide protests in advance of trial of former Minneapolis police officer charged in the killing of George Floyd; judicial districts amendment faces bipartisan skepticism in PA.


2021Talks - March 8, 2021 


After a whirlwind voting session the Senate approves $1.9 Trillion COVID relief bill, President Biden signs an executive order to expand voting access and the president plans a news conference this month.

Public News Service - WA: Rural/Farming

Some Seattle restaurants secure their salmon supplies months in advance, to ensure they can serve this iconic Northwest fish. (Aldo/Adobe Stock)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

SEATTLE -- If the Pacific Northwest has a taste, it's for the region's salmon, but as the iconic fish species dwindles, it also effects a food chain that brings the salmon from boats to plates. A Northwest infrastructure proposal is seen by some as a lifeline to industries across the region. John

Workers are on strike at four of the six fruit packing warehouses in Yakima Valley. (Shauri Tello)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Workers in Yakima's fruit packing warehouses are mourning the loss of a colleague to COVID-19. The virus has hit Yakima County hard, prompting workers at six fruit companies to strike for better conditions over the past few weeks. David Cruz, who worked at Allan Brothers Fruit f

Researchers at Washington State University are studying a protein that could make plants more tolerant to drought. (Scott/Adobe Stock)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

SPOKANE, Wash. - Researchers at Washington State University may have found a way to help crops adapt to a warming climate. Phytologist Karen Sanguinet - an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at WSU - is studying a protein that she says could help plants move water more

Workers at seven fruit-packing companies in the Yakima Valley are on strike. (Edgar Franks/Familias Unidas por la Justicia)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

YAKIMA, Wash. -- Farm and fruit-packing workers are considered essential. And in Washington state, they're roiled in struggles for better working conditions. Yakima County is the biggest hotspot for coronavirus cases on the West Coast, and the fruit-packing warehouses in the area have been a vecto

Some farmworkers say they've struggled to get access to protective gear to keep working safely during the pandemic. (littlewolf1989/Adobe Stock)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

SEATTLE -- Many farmworkers in Washington state say they feel left behind and in the dark in the coronavirus pandemic. Considered essential personnel, farmworkers have continued doing their jobs. But Executive Director of the farmworkers' rights group Community to Community Development Rosalinda G

Nonprofit contractors that hire farmworkers would have to comply with farm labor laws under a bill passed Tuesday by the state Senate. (Kakisky/Morguefile)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- Farmworker advocacy groups say a bill on farmworkers' rights that just passed the state Senate is a good first step. SB 6261 would get rid of a loophole that exempts nonprofit contractors from the Farm Labor Contractor Act, which sets minimum standards for the treatment of farmwo

Lawmakers in Olympia are considering a bill that would regulate water-rights sales to water banks. (Steve Voght/Flickr)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

OLYMPIA, Wash -- Washington state lawmakers are taking up an issue that has vexed western states for decades - how to manage water resources. They want to tackle water speculation, which is squeezing some users. The concern is mostly about who owns water banks, which collect water rights from land

Farmworkers were at the State Capitol in Olympia this week, pushing for an update to the Washington Farm Labor Contractor Act. (Community to Community Development)

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- The landscape for farms and farmworkers has changed significantly in the past 70 years, so farm workers' advocates want the Evergreen State to update the Washington Farm Labor Contractor Act. This week, legislators held a hearing on Senate Bill 6261, including testimony from farmw

1 of 12 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »