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PNS Daily News - December 16, 2019 


Sen. Chuck Schumer calls for four specific witnesses in Senate impeachment trial; giving Iowans with disabilities a voice in caucuses; and an expert says Seasonal Affective Disorder is a lot more than just the holiday blues.

2020Talks - December 16, 2019 


Sen. Cory Booker led the charge asking the DNC to ease up debate qualification requirements. All seven candidates who made the cut for Thursday's debate say they won't participate in the debate at Loyola Marymount in LA if it means crossing the picket line of Unite Here Local 11.

Public News Service - WA: Rural/Farming

A bill in Congress would protect the Olympic Peninsula's Queets River. (Sam Beebe/Flickr)

ABERDEEN, Wash. – A bill a decade in the making to protect parts of the Olympic National Forest passed out of committee in Congress yesterday. The Wild Olympics Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers Act would permanently protect more than 126,000 acres of the forest as wilderness, and 19 riv

A bill creating a path to legal status for farmworkers would also require farms to adopt E-Verify, a controversial system used to check employment eligibility. (ablokhin/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – Farm-industry leaders are cheering a bill in Congress that would provide a path to legal status for the workers they hire. But those laborers remain skeptical. Co-authored by Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Washington (4th District), the Farm Workforce Modernization Act lays out a years-long

The Tilth Alliance, its Seattle community garden seen above, is bringing together farmers and farmworkers in Yakima this weekend. (CAJC: in the PNW/Flickr)

YAKIMA, Wash. – Washingtonians who work the land to provide their neighbors with food are coming together, as the production season slows down. The 45th annual Tilth Conference starts today in Yakima and the focus is on "growing a resilient future." Erin Murphy, statewide education coordinat

Community to Community Development helped pass legislation in Washington state this year that provides more oversight to a federal guest-worker program. (Community to Community Development)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. – A unique grassroots organization that supports immigrant and farmworkers' rights in Washington state is celebrating 15 years of fighting back. Community to Community Development is holding its 15th anniversary in Bellingham, highlighting some of its accomplishments over t

The Farmworker March for Dignity will start at a Customs and Border Patrol station in Ferndale, Wash. (Edgar Franks/Community to Community Development)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. – Farmworkers and their supporters are marching in northern Washington this weekend. Environmental and racial justice groups will walk alongside laborers in Bellingham for the 2019 March for Dignity. Rosalinda Guillen, executive director of the farmworkers' rights group Comm

A farmworker holds up a sign that says

MATTAWA, Wash. – Workers on a farm in south central Washington state have gone on strike over what they see as threats from management to meet production standards. The laborers on King Fuji Ranch in Mattawa, a small town north of the Tri-Cities, say they contacted the farmworker union Famil

Alliances between rural communities and Native tribes have sprung up across the West and Midwest to protect local lands and waters. (Zoltán Grossman)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Native American and non-Native communities have joined forces across the country to form what could be the base of a new environmental movement. Zoltán Grossman, a geography and Native studies professor at Evergreen State College in Olympia, is the author of "Unlikely A

A southern Washington community is managing nearby forestland. (Jeff Hollett/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A bill in the Washington State Legislature could give communities more control over local forests. Senate Bill 5873 would create a community forest pilot program to fund and monitor three projects in the state. Max Webster, evergreen forest program manager for the Washingt

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