Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 27, 2019 


More time on the ground for the Boeing 737 MAX. Also on our Thursday rundown: A diverse group tackles the topic of salmon recovery. Plus, summer bees are buzzing, but for how long?

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Toxics

In 2011, the EPA released its first-ever findings of environmental discrimination in a case of pesticide spray near a California school. (Chafer Machinery/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency rarely investigates complaints from minority communities that allege local environmental regulations are discriminatory. According to the Center for Public Integrity, only one of seven cases in Washington state has been accepted for investigation sinc

The Dog Aging Project is recruiting dogs in middle age to participate in the study of a drug that could extend the pets' lives. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - Researchers from the University of Washington are studying a drug that could extend the lives of dogs and one day, maybe even humans. The drug rapamycin, typically used to treat organ-transplant patients, could be used at low doses to slow the aging process, attacking cancer and other ag

At full strength, a proposed coal-export terminal in Longview would ship 44 million tons of coal overseas each year. (Sam Beebe/Ecotrust)

PASCO, Wash. – Supporters and opponents are gathering in Pasco today for the final public hearing on a massive coal-export terminal in Longview. Meetings were held in Longview and Spokane last week after the release of an environmental impact study by the Washington State Department of Ecolo

The House and Senate are updating the 40-year-old Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate cancer-causing chemicals more quickly. (Pixabay)

SEATTLE - Today is World Cancer Day, and if you look around, you might find household items contaminated with potentially cancer-causing toxins. Some states, including Washington, have done their duty to ban chemicals linked to cancer like bisphenol-A, found in baby bottles and canned food liners,

Spokane-area residents pack an Oct. 27 meeting about Avista's continued use of power generated from coal. Courtesy: Sierra Club

SPOKANE, Wash. – Avista, the electric utility that serves much of eastern Washington, is planning its next 20 years of power output – and some customers aren't happy that part of it is coal power. The public comment period ends Friday evening on Avista's 20-year Integrated Resource Pla

TransAlta power plant in Centralia. A march and rally were held in Seattle on Wednesday to bring attention to communities impacted by climate change. Courtesy Sierra Club.

SEATTLE – A demonstration in Seattle Wednesday drew greater attention to the people that environmental advocacy groups say are most affected by climate change. Holding colorful signs and banners, hundreds gathered at City Hall and then marched to Occidental Park for a rally. Organizer Fern

Scott Mazzone, a marine biologist with the Quinault Indian Nation, takes water quality samples. Credit: Debbie Ross-Preston, NW Indian Fisheries Commission.

SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing changes to the water quality standards for human health in Washington, after the state has spent years deciding how to create its own standards. At issue are two key components of water quality, the fish consumption rate and the canc

Shell's Polar Pioneer drilling rig arrived in the Seattle area to protests, and left Elliott Bay in mid-June. Credit: Jeff Dunnicliffe for The Backbone Campaign/Flickr.

SEATTLE – It's back to court on Friday for the Port of Seattle, and conservation groups that contend the port commissioners didn't conduct an environmental assessment before signing a lease to allow repair of oil-drilling rigs at the port. The groups maintain the water pollution risks are ob

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