Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - WA: Water

The Nooksack River is crucial salmon habitat for the Northwest. (Patrick McNall/Flickr)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. -- Construction crews have begun work to remove the Middle Fork Nooksack Dam near Bellingham, restoring a crucial river for salmon. The project is decades in the making and is critical as fish species in the Northwest dwindle. Steven Day, project engineer for the City of Bellin

Researchers at Washington State University are studying a protein that could make plants more tolerant to drought. (Scott/Adobe Stock)

SPOKANE, Wash. - Researchers at Washington State University may have found a way to help crops adapt to a warming climate. Phytologist Karen Sanguinet - an assistant professor in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at WSU - is studying a protein that she says could help plants move water more

Dwindling salmon numbers in the Pacific Northwest have hit Southern Resident orca populations hard. (j.c. winkler/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Energy companies and conservation groups want to bridge the divide on a contentious issue in the Northwest: the future of four Snake River dams. This week, utilities and environmental groups came together to write an open letter to the governors of Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington,

Lawmakers in Olympia are considering a bill that would regulate water-rights sales to water banks. (Steve Voght/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash -- Washington state lawmakers are taking up an issue that has vexed western states for decades - how to manage water resources. They want to tackle water speculation, which is squeezing some users. The concern is mostly about who owns water banks, which collect water rights from land

Gov.Inslee's Southern Resident Orca Task Force has recommended considering the impacts of four lower Snake River dams on salmon populations. (Bonneville Power/Flickr)

SEATTLE - A report on the future of the Snake River in southeast Washington comes out today. The Lower Snake River Dams Stakeholder draft report relies on perspectives from more than 100 stakeholders and more than 3,500 online responders. While there are no recommendations, it could be an influent

A bill in Congress would protect the Olympic Peninsula's Queets River. (Sam Beebe/Flickr)

ABERDEEN, Wash. – A bill a decade in the making to protect parts of the Olympic National Forest passed out of committee in Congress yesterday. The Wild Olympics Wilderness and Wild and Scenic Rivers Act would permanently protect more than 126,000 acres of the forest as wilderness, and 19 riv

A new film underscores the plight of the remaining 73 Southern Resident orcas in the Northwest, by examining their primary food source. (Peterson Hawley Productions)

SEATTLE – A new documentary film argues that removing dams in eastern Washington would help the Northwest's dwindling population of orcas. "Dammed to Extinction" explores the impact of four lower Snake River dams on Chinook salmon populations – the iconic Southern Resident orcas' main

Nearly three-quarters of western Washington municipalities are making progress toward controlling polluting stormwater runoff. (Seattle.gov)

SEATTLE – After years of work, cities in Washington are doing more to protect Puget Sound from its biggest source of pollution: stormwater runoff. A report from the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance and Washington Environmental Council helped motivate them. In 2017, the groups released their prog

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