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PNS Daily Newscast - July 14, 2020 


The Trump administration issues talking points challenging health expert Fauci; Latinos challenge voting system in Washington State.

2020Talks - July 14, 2020 


Maine has its statewide primaries today; Texas and Alabama have primary runoffs. And lawsuits abound against the White House's new ICE rule, threatening to deport international students taking only online courses.

Public News Service - WA: Civil Rights

The rate of Black and Latinx young people admitted to jails has fallen faster than the rate for white youth during the pandemic. (luaeva/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- Fewer young people are being admitted to jails because of COVID-19, according to data from The Annie E. Casey Foundation. And the drop has been bigger for youth of color than their white peers. Data from about a third of juvenile detention facilities finds total admissions were down

Norm Stamper was Seattle police chief during the 1999 crackdown on WTO protesters. He calls it a painful learning experience. (Seattle Municipal Archives/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- A former Seattle police chief says American policing needs sweeping change. Norm Stamper was head of the Seattle Police Department from 1994 to 2000, including when police cracked down on World Trade Organization protesters in 1999. Stamper says his officers' actions contributed to conf

Hispanic and African-American populations in King County make up a disproportionate number of confirmed coronavirus cases. (H_Ko/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE -- While cases of coronavirus are going down in Washington state, racial disparities increasingly are being laid bare. According to the Washington State Department of Health, white people are 68% of the state's population, but make up 43% of cases. Meanwhile, 13% of the state is Hispanic,

People can register to vote using a nearby address if they are living unsheltered. (David Lee/Flickr)

SEATTLE - How do you vote by mail in Washington if you don't have an address? People who are homeless have some options to get their ballots counted in the Evergreen State. Hillary Coleman, community projects manager with Seattle/King County Coalition on Homelessness, says it's important to unders

NWDC Resistance is part of a lawsuit against ICE that accuses the agency of illegally targeting one of its members. (Common Language Project/Flickr)

SEATTLE -- Newly revealed emails show U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials discussed taking away the "clout" of a Washington state activist. The emails were released as evidence in a lawsuit against ICE by two immigrant rights groups, accusing the agency of intentionally targeting a

A Washington State Supreme Court decision on releasing public employees' information has raised concerns, particularly for survivors of domestic violence. (tashatuvango/Adobe Stock)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A lot of information can be gleaned from a birth date. That's why Washington state public employees are raising safety concerns about a recent state Supreme Court decision – and hope lawmakers will correct it. In October, justices sided with the Freedom Foundation that

A bill creating a path to legal status for farmworkers would also require farms to adopt E-Verify, a controversial system used to check employment eligibility. (ablokhin/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE – Farm-industry leaders are cheering a bill in Congress that would provide a path to legal status for the workers they hire. But those laborers remain skeptical. Co-authored by Rep. Dan Newhouse, R-Washington (4th District), the Farm Workforce Modernization Act lays out a years-long

More than 130,000 adults in Washington state were evicted from rental properties between 2013 and 2017. (designer491/Adobe Stock)

SEATTLE — Most renters facing eviction lack access to legal counsel, and because of that, are set up to fail, says a new analysis. The Center for American Progress brief found nationwide, about 90% of landlords have legal representation in eviction cases, while only 10% of tenants do. Accor

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