Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 25, 2018 


President Trump scraps planned talks with North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Also on our Friday rundown: California lawmakers support and emergency hotline for foster kids; and boating is a booming business in states like Minnesota.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Civil Rights

The Washington state Supreme Court has implemented a new rule that could reduce racial bias in the jury-selection process. (Jason Rosenberg/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Washington is set to become the first state to tackle racial bias in the jury-selection process. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of April, bars attorneys from excluding someone not only for intentional racial bias but also "implicit, institutional and unconscious" b

The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear a case on the DACA program, giving Congress more time to find a solution. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The Supreme Court has rejected the Trump administration's request to bypass a lower court and hear a case on the fate of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The decision gives a reprieve to more than 700,000 recipients of DACA, including 19,000 in Washington state w

President Donald Trump and Washington Gov. Jay Inslee are taking different approaches on drug policy. (Chip Somodevilla/GettyImages)

SEATTLE – The Trump administration is proposing harsher penalties for drug offenses, even as states such as Washington look for other solutions. According to a report from the news outlet Axios, President Donald Trump has praised countries like the Philippines and Singapore, where drug traf

Public-employee unions in Washington state could take a financial hit if the U.S. Supreme Court sides with an Illinois worker in his case against AFSCME. (WFSE)

SEATTLE – Public employee union members in Washington state will be closely watching the U.S. Supreme Court case Janus v. AFSCME on Monday. Greg Devereux, executive director of the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE), says if justices side with Illinois worker Mark Janus, it woul

Groups like Chaplain on the Harbor will be in Renton on Saturday recruiting for this year's Poor People's Campaign. (Poor People's Campaign)

RENTON, Wash. – In 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Poor People's Campaign. A half-century later, the campaign is still going – and this week, its organizers held events at state capitols calling for a "moral revival" across the country. On Saturday, groups including Chap

The 1968 sanitation workers' strike in Memphis attracted the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (iam2018.org)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Union members across the country are honoring two sanitation workers killed in Memphis 50 years ago today with a moment of silence. Leading up to the deaths of Echol Cole and Robert Walker, workers had complained about unsafe conditions, but were ignored. Their deaths led to

It was revealed last week that a Washington state agency was sharing residents' personal information with federal immigration authorities as many as 20 times a week. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

SEATTLE – Immigrant and human rights advocates announced Tuesday they're seeking more information on the collaboration between a Washington state agency and federal immigration authorities. Freedom of Information Act requests have been filed to find out how much the Washington state Departme

On Wednesday, a Washington State Senate committee held a public hearing in Olympia on two bills that address the gender pay gap in the state. (SounderBruce/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- At its current rate, the pay gap for women in Washington state compared to men won't close until 2070. As the new legislative session begins, hopes are high that 2018 is the year lawmakers update the state's equal-pay laws and close that gap much sooner. On Wednesday, the Senate

1 of 8 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »