Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 19, 2018 


Updates on Trump tariffs and his Supreme Court nominee. Also on the Wednesday rundown: New Hampshire in the news in a clean energy report; and doctors address the rise of AFib – a serious and sometimes invisible cardiac issue.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Civil Rights

About 90 percent of people of European descent can expect to have a third cousin on the genealogical DNA website GEDMatch, according to one geneticist. (Libertas Academica/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The use of online genetic databases has helped to crack cold murder cases recently, including two decades-old murders in Washington state. But this technique also is raising ethical questions. The publicly available genealogy site GEDMatch was most notably used to catch the Golde

Civil rights groups say only 2 percent of applicants for waivers under the travel ban have received them. (malisunshine/Twenty20)

SEATTLE – Civil rights groups are mounting another challenge to the Trump administration's travel ban with a lawsuit alleging the waiver process in the ban is a "sham" that is keeping families apart. Groups, including two based in Washington state, and plaintiffs from all of the Muslim-major

President Donald Trump has promised to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy with a Supreme Court pick who will overturn Roe v. Wade. (trac1/Twenty20)

SEATTLE — Supporters of women's rights say developments at the U.S. Supreme Court are putting the future of reproductive rights in peril. Last week, the court ruled in a 5-4 decision that so-called crisis pregnancy centers run by anti-abortion groups cannot be compelled by states to post inf

In her dissent, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor compared the travel ban to the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. (Masha George/Flickr)

SEATTLE – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Trump administration's travel ban from five majority-Muslim countries on Tuesday. In the 5-4 vote, the supporting justices said the ban was within the president's authority to make national security decisions, and did not find his inflammatory state

The U.S. government has moved more than 1,400 detainees at the border to federal prisons, including the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac. (SoundersBruce/Wikimedia Commons)

SEATAC, Wash. – Pressures are mounting under new Trump administration policies that separate immigrant families. More than 200 people seeking asylum are being held in a federal prison in SeaTac, many of whom are mothers taken away from their children at the border. And a new Department of

A fellowship program hopes to make the law profession more diverse. (Scott/Red Fish Blue Fish Photography)

SEATTLE – A fellowship is helping law students to explore their interest in social justice issues. The Washington State Association for Justice fellowship is focused on plaintiff law, including civil rights issues, consumer law and workers' compensation. It's a change of pace for many law

Washington state anti-discrimination laws remain intact despite the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to side with a Colorado bakery owner this week for refusing to serve a same-sex couple. (Davis Staedtler/Flickr)

SEATTLE - After siding with a Colorado bakery that refused to make a cake for a same-sex couple this week, the U.S. Supreme Court will look at a petition for a similar case from Washington state on Thursday. Although the court ruled 7-2 in favor of Masterpiece Cakeshop, the decision was narrowly fo

The Washington state Supreme Court has implemented a new rule that could reduce racial bias in the jury-selection process. (Jason Rosenberg/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Washington is set to become the first state to tackle racial bias in the jury-selection process. The new rule, which goes into effect at the end of April, bars attorneys from excluding someone not only for intentional racial bias but also "implicit, institutional and unconscious" b

1 of 9 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »