Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2019 


President Trump asks SCOTUS to block release of his tax returns; use of the death penalty is on the decline across the country; and a push to make nutrition part of the health-care debate.

2020Talks - November 15, 2019 


Former MA Gov. Deval Patrick is officially running for president, saying he can attract more Independents and moderate Republicans than other candidates.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Native American

The EPA has until November to finalize new rules, known as fish consumption rules, for water quality standards in Washington. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - A U.S. federal judge has told the EPA it must finalize new water-quality rules aimed at making Washington state waters cleaner. The rules are known as fish consumption rules because they must ensure that fish caught in Washington state waters are safe to eat. Last year, the EPA said Washin

A federal appeals court has ruled that Washington state must repair culverts blocking salmon from swimming to upstream habitats. (Matthew_Hull/morguefile)

SEATTLE – Native American tribes in Washington state received a victory Monday from a federal appeals court that ruled the state must pay to fix fish blocking culverts. Culverts allow rivers and streams to flow underneath roadways, but can be trouble for salmon swimming upstream if the culve

At full strength, a proposed coal-export terminal in Longview would ship 44 million tons of coal overseas each year. (Sam Beebe/Ecotrust)

PASCO, Wash. – Supporters and opponents are gathering in Pasco today for the final public hearing on a massive coal-export terminal in Longview. Meetings were held in Longview and Spokane last week after the release of an environmental impact study by the Washington State Department of Ecolo

Washington currently estimates people eat about 8 ounces of fish per month. (lauramusikanski/Morguefile)

SEATTLE - A lawsuit filed by a number of environmental groups in the state of Washington against the Environmental Protection Agency might have you rethinking the fish proportions you eat. Waterway watchdog groups and commercial fishing organizations are asking the U.S. District Court to decide on

PHOTO: Members of the Swinomish Tribe, seen here at a tribal ceremony, are concerned that long trains of oil tank cars are crossing their reservation every week, a development the Tribe says violates its 1991 easement agreement with a rail company. Photo credit: Leslie Dierauf/U.S. Geological Survey.

SEATTLE - A Native American tribe says too many trains, some of which carry volatile Bakken crude, are crossing its reservation and it's suing the rail company to stop them. The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community alleges BNSF Railway is violating an easement agreement made in 1991. The agreement se

PHOTO: Beavers are busy in the Snohomish watershed, as they're being relocated to higher elevations where their dam-building skills help moderate stream flow and provide better habitat for salmon and other fish. Photo courtesy Beavers Northwest.

SEATTLE - Sometimes moving to a new neighborhood is the best choice for everyone. That's the theory behind a research project by the Tulalip Tribes of Washington to relocate beaver families. The critters have become a nuisance in the lowlands but in higher elevations, their hard work can benefit th

PHOTO: A side of toxins with that? Groups critical of Washington's proposal to update water-quality standards claim it doesn't do enough to clean up pollution or curtail industrial waste discharge, while health warnings persist for eating fish caught in some locations. Photo credit: JRStock/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. - People can comment starting this week on new state water quality standards that already have been years in the making in Washington. Anyone who eats or catches fish will want to take a look at them. The new standards are based on higher fish consumption rates that are more realisti

PHOTO: Recommendations from the Washington Dept. of Ecology outline how to fund and prepare for oil-shipment emergencies, when tribes and conservation groups think the focus should be on curtailing oil transport through the state. Photo credit: marpalusz/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington Department of Ecology made recommendations this week for what the state could do to handle and fund the risks that come with increased shipments of oil by rail and water. Its report says 3 million gallons a week already move through Washington by train, a numb

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