Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 27, 2020 


The U.S. now has more confirmed coronavirus cases than any other country. Despite the pandemic, Election 2020 continues and states are making changes.

2020Talks - March 27, 2020 


3.3 million people reported being jobless last week, according to new Labor Department numbers. And Puerto Rico was supposed to hold primaries this weekend, though they pushed it back to late April, because of COVID-19.

Public News Service - WA: Native American

PHOTO: A side of toxins with that? Groups critical of Washington's proposal to update water-quality standards claim it doesn't do enough to clean up pollution or curtail industrial waste discharge, while health warnings persist for eating fish caught in some locations. Photo credit: JRStock/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. - People can comment starting this week on new state water quality standards that already have been years in the making in Washington. Anyone who eats or catches fish will want to take a look at them. The new standards are based on higher fish consumption rates that are more realisti

PHOTO: Recommendations from the Washington Dept. of Ecology outline how to fund and prepare for oil-shipment emergencies, when tribes and conservation groups think the focus should be on curtailing oil transport through the state. Photo credit: marpalusz/FeaturePics.com

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington Department of Ecology made recommendations this week for what the state could do to handle and fund the risks that come with increased shipments of oil by rail and water. Its report says 3 million gallons a week already move through Washington by train, a numb

PHOTO: Maury Forman addresses a group of prospective entrepreneurs in Republic, Wash., an area that will feel the economic effects of the Buckhorn gold mine closure in 2015 and where residents are looking at other business opportunities. Photo courtesy Washington Dept. of Commerce.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Move over Shark Tank! Washington entrepreneurs are ready to dive into new business ventures – and across the state, this is the week to get started. The third annual Global Entrepreneurship Week has grown to include every county, and more than 200 workshops and class

PHOTO: Eleven oil-by-rail projects have been proposed for the Northwest since 2012. This car, known as a DOT-111, is the type that carries Bakken crude oil. Photo courtesy U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.
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SEATTLE - About two dozen projects have been proposed in the past two years to move the Northwest toward becoming a transportation hub for coal, oil and gas to Asia. A new Sightline Institute report examines the combination of rail, pipeline and fuel terminal proposals across Washington, Oregon and

PHOTO: This tiny sturgeon fry could grow up to be 5 to 6 feet in length, and can live for 70 years or more. This weekend's Columbia River Sturgeon Festival in Vancouver, Wash. pays tribute to this prehistoric fish species. Photo courtesy Wash. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Salmon get the lion's share of attention in the Pacific Northwest, but a festival this weekend in Vancouver calls attention to another fascinating fish species. The sturgeon may not be considered beautiful or iconic, but like salmon, it also requires careful management by

PHOTO: The National Marine Fisheries Service must review its permit that allows U.S. Navy training exercises along the Pacific coast. Research shows using sonar could be adversely affecting orcas and other marine mammals. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.

SEATTLE - This holiday season may bring a little more "peace on earth" to Washington's famous orcas and other marine mammals along the coast. A federal judge has given the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) a deadline to come up with a new plan to protect sea life from the damaging effects of

PHOTO: Two oil shipping terminals proposed for Grays Harbor on the central Washington coast are on hold. Their permits are being reversed for further environmental study of possible risks associated with increased oil shipments by rail and tanker traffic by sea. Photo credit: Grays Harbor Tourism

HOQUIAM, Wash. – Plans for two new terminals to store oil and pump it into tankers in Grays Harbor are on hold after the Quinault Indian Nation and several conservation groups challenged the permits. Washington state’s Shorelines Hearings Board reversed the permits that already had bee

PHOTO: Ariel view of Grays Harbor. Photo Credit: Quinault Indian Nation

SEATTLE - Tens of millions of barrels a year: that's how much crude oil is projected to be rolling by rail to Washington state under a proposal that's being challenged by local tribes and community groups. According to Tyson Johnston, First Councilman with the Quinault Indian Nation, his tribe wan

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