Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2019 


Chants of a different sort greet U.S. Rep. Omar upon her return home to Minnesota. Also on our Friday rundown: A new report says gunshot survivors need more outreach, support. Plus, sharing climate-change perspectives in Charlotte.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Environmental Justice

PHOTO: Debris and chemical residue end up in storm drains and are carried into local waterways, affecting fish and drinking water. After three years, Clark County has agreed to comply with the federal Clean Water Act to minimize storm-water runoff. Photo credit: iStockphoto.

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The year's end also marks the end of a three-year court battle over water quality standards for Clark County – and all sides are calling it a win. This week, Clark County commissioners settled the penalty phase of a lawsuit to bring the county into compliance with the

PHOTO: The National Marine Fisheries Service must review its permit that allows U.S. Navy training exercises along the Pacific coast. Research shows using sonar could be adversely affecting orcas and other marine mammals. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.

SEATTLE - This holiday season may bring a little more "peace on earth" to Washington's famous orcas and other marine mammals along the coast. A federal judge has given the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) a deadline to come up with a new plan to protect sea life from the damaging effects of

PHOTO: A little less appetizing? Groups suing the EPA say it isn't moving fast enough to require stronger state water quality laws in Washington, to ensure that locally-caught fish are safe to eat. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.

SEATTLE – Some fishing and conservation groups say Washington's water pollution laws aren't strong enough and they're suing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to step in and make the state change them. State water pollution standards are based at least partly on how much fish people c

PHOTO: Two oil shipping terminals proposed for Grays Harbor on the central Washington coast are on hold. Their permits are being reversed for further environmental study of possible risks associated with increased oil shipments by rail and tanker traffic by sea. Photo credit: Grays Harbor Tourism

HOQUIAM, Wash. – Plans for two new terminals to store oil and pump it into tankers in Grays Harbor are on hold after the Quinault Indian Nation and several conservation groups challenged the permits. Washington state’s Shorelines Hearings Board reversed the permits that already had bee

PHOTO: Will the fourth federal plan to save endangered salmon species make headway? Its critics say it isn't much different than earlier plans that were found lacking. Photo credit: iStockphoto.com.

SEATTLE - Another deadline is approaching in the lengthy court battle to protect endangered Northwest wild salmon species, and this week the federal government has done its part to meet it by submitting a draft version of an updated plan. However, conservation and fishing groups say there's nothing

PHOTO: The Basel Action Network estimates 75 percent of the electronic waste that arrives in Lagos, Nigeria, is not reusable. BAN says too often, as in this photo, it ends up being dumped. Courtesy BAN.

SEATTLE - “Out with the old, in with the new” takes on a whole new meaning when the topic is electronic gear. A new national certification program born in Seattle ensures that recyclers properly dispose of items such as laptops, televisions and cell phones. According to the Basel Action

PHOTO: This U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service photo shows fish casualties the agency says were the result of pesticide contamination. Courtesy of USFWS.

SEATTLE - This week, a federal court in Virginia is being asked to overturn a decision that has major impacts on Northwest salmon and steelhead. In four western states, including Washington, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recommends buffers around salmon streams of at least 500 feet wh

PHOTO: Hoh River Cascading through the rainforest at Olympic National Park, Washington.  Corbis.  All Rights Reserved.

SEATTLE - After a decade of legal challenges, the "roadless rule" landed on the U.S. Supreme Court's doorstep, and on Monday, the court opted to leave it in place rather than hear the latest appeal. The rule doesn't allow new road-building on millions of acres of national forest land in three dozen

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